Category: Sustainability Practices inside the Publishing Industry

Blog Book Tour | “Beyond Basics with Natural Yeast (Recipes for Whole Grain Health)” by Melissa Richardson #Foodie #Baking An impressive guide to succeeding at homemade (natural yeast) baking projects!

Posted Sunday, 14 December, 2014 by jorielov , , , , 2 Comments

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Beyond Basics with Natural Yeast : Recipes for Whole Grain Health 

by Melissa Richardson

Published By: Front Table Books (@FrontTableBooks),
an imprint of Cedar Fort, Inc (@CedarFortBooks)

Available Formats: Paperback, Ebook

Converse on Twitter via: #TheBreadGeek, #Baking, #naturalyeast & #Bread

Acquired Book By: I am a regular tour hostess for blog tours via Cedar Fort whereupon I am thankful to have such a diverse amount of novels and non-fiction titles to choose amongst to host. I received a complimentary copy of “Beyond Basics with Natural Yeast” direct from the publisher Front Table Books (imprint of Cedar Fort, Inc) in exchange for an honest review. I did not receive compensation for my opinions or thoughts shared herein.

Inspired to Read:

My inspiration to read and grow in my knowledge about yeast is twofold: I developed a fascinating addiction to bread from a very young age (I take after my Mum!) combining with the stories of my Uncle who was taught how to knead bread in order to reduce his stress levels (therein a curiosity to make homemade bread germinated in my mind) and through my research (in step with my Mum’s) into healthy living, eating, and the way in which foods affect us on a physiological level (and beyond) I have known for awhile there is a staunch different between ‘good’ and ‘bad’ yeast.

I wasn’t as sure if I had the resources I need to take on this particular project of mine, but I wanted to gain knowledge, as knowledge is the first step towards doing anything in our lives; including bettering ourselves in the kitchen! Therefore what surprised me (as you will soon see revealed) wasn’t a lack of an ingredient or a repertoire of baking items to use, no rather it was a more precise ‘issue’ I have no control over and thus, had to abandon my idea of creating my own natural yeast at this point in time. Meanwhile, the joy I had when I saw this book go on tour remains because I truly believe one way to change our lives is to effectively find better ways to nourish ourselves and broker an independence off what is quick and fast, for something that is more dynamically beneficial to our bodies, minds, and spirits.

As foresaid on my previous two blog tours for Front Table Books, my own journey towards living a healthier lifestyle is in a very unique stage at the moment — you can read my thoughts on where I am on either my review of Gluten-Free Made Easy OR The Secrets of Gluten-Free Baking wherein I speak openly and honestly about my quest for a healthier future. Part of my long-term goals are to provide more photo journals on my blog for each Front Table cookbook I am receiving from Cedar Fort. You will find my first foray into merging my joy of photography with my foodie heart’s quest to being a more well-rounded cook on my showcase for Gluten-Free Made Easy; if you are on Twitter you can easily favour or re-tweet the specific points of that post to your followers. It was the first time I hosted a live-as-you-bake sequence of photo journals on Twitter.

Blog Book Tour | “Beyond Basics with Natural Yeast (Recipes for Whole Grain Health)” by Melissa Richardson #Foodie #Baking An impressive guide to succeeding at homemade (natural yeast) baking projects!Beyond Basics with Natural Yeast
Subtitle: Recipes for Whole Grain Health
by Melissa Richardson
Source: Direct from Publisher

With allergies to commercial yeast on the rise, natural yeast is the easy and healthy solution to baking all the foods you love. Brush up on your techniques with Melissa Richardson’s newest book, Beyond Basics with Natural Yeast, with mouthwatering recipes like Soft Pretzel Rolls, Honey Whole Wheat Bread, and Lemon Chiffon Cake. Say goodbye to commercial yeast, and hello to a healthier body!

Read the Book Synopsis for The Art of Baking with Natural Yeast, the companion to this release and the first of the series. I decided to name the series myself as it felt as though it was implied but I am unsure if there will be more in sequence past these two books thus released.

Places to find the book:

Borrow from a Public Library

Add to LibraryThing

Genres: Baking, Baking with Natural Yeast, Cookery


Published by Front Table Books

on 31st September, 2014

Format: Hardcover

Pages: 200

About Melissa Richardson

Melissa Richardson is a mother of three who is addicted to researching, studying, and baking bread. As a college student Melissa taught herself to bake as a way to pinch pennies from the food budget and unleashed a passion that transformed her into The Bread Geek she is today. At any given time of day, flour can be found somewhere on her shoes, clothes, hands, or children. When not baking or writing, she enjoys collecting hobbies and spending time outdoors with her family.

Be sure to check out "The Bread Geek" on YouTube!

Read More

Reading this book contributed to these challenges:

  • Go Indie
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Posted Sunday, 14 December, 2014 by jorielov in Bits & Bobbles of Jorie, Blog Tour Host & Reviewer, Bread Making, Cedar Fort Publishing & Media, Cookbook, Cookery, Indie Author, Locavore, Non-Fiction, Social Change, Sustainability Practices inside the Publishing Industry, The Bookish Foodie, Vignettes of Real Life

+Blog Book Tour+ The Lost Duchess by Jenny Barden

Posted Friday, 20 June, 2014 by jorielov , , , 5 Comments

Parajunkee Designs

The Lost Duchess by Jenny Barden

The Lost Duchess Virtual Book Tour with HFVBT

Published By: Ebury Press (), 5 June, 2014 (paperback)
an imprint of Random House Group, Ltd. UK ()

Official Author Websites: Site | Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Author is Active on: English Historical Fiction Authors Blog

Available Formats:  Hardcover, Paperback, & Ebook
Page Count: 448

Converse on Twitter: #LostDuchessBlogTour & #TheLostDuchess OR

Fun Stuff for Your Blog via pureimaginationblog.com

Acquired Book By: I was selected to be a tour stop on the “The Lost Duchess” virtual book tour through HFVBT: Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours. I received a complimentary copy of the book direct from the author Jenny Barden, in exchange for an honest review. I did not receive compensation for my opinions or thoughts shared herein.

Curiosity Inspired Me to Read:

I felt plumb delighted to read this novel as it sounded quite exciting if you ask me! I love the appeal of diving into the lost colonies and of course, who wouldn’t like a thriller set at sea and land?!

I am always a reader whose eye bewitches her attention from one period of history to another, and the one section of literature I have not yet rallied my will to venture into is that of the high seas epics! I have already earmarked off the novels of Patrick O’ Brian and others like him, who enhance my curiosity and warm me to the descriptions of life at sea. I am an adventurer in spirit, and as I had relaid to MaryLu Tyndall last year whilst she was touring the blogosphere for Forsaken Dreams, I felt inclined to tell her that if I had had the proposition to set sail for a new world and a new way of living, I’d have embarked on the journey forthwith! My mind furvoured over this recollection as I broached the premise of The Lost Duchess; twirling over in my mind if I was ready to set sail and fully breathe in narrative on the high seas! As you can see, the answer that bubbled to the surface was a resounding yes! And, I think a bit inspired by my fascination and delight in reading a ChocLitUK novel entitled: Close to the Wind!

I am always forever grateful when there are enclosures with the books I receive for review, in this particular case, the paperback copy of The Lost Duchess was signed by the author! She even went so far as to include a business card which features the book cover art and her contact information, as well as a lovely postcard which includes the book synopsis on one side and a framed book cover image on the opposite one! I am always marvelling at the little surprises authors and publishers tuck into books for book bloggers, because it is one step closer to keeping the circle between us an interactive experience. I even adore the Editor’s Notes that come inside ARCs or the extensive Press Releases which publishers generally tuck inside ARCs and finished copies alike! Little bobbles of joy which make me smile as I ease into the narratives at hand! A charming reminder that what we do as we blog is appreciated but more than that, that writers are as bookish as the readers who appreciate the opportunity to read their novels! In that, we all like to have little tangible memories to reflect back on our experiences, and I am always pleasantly delighted to find what is included inside my book parcels!

I cannot express my gratitude enough for the bookmarks, as previously mentioned mine are all packed along with my personal library (for the most part!). The little business card for The Lost Duchess held my place as I shifted through the pages, and it was as fondly used as the curious little business card I wished I had had for To Live Forever by Andra Wakins! I watched so many of Wakins “Natchez Trace videos” I nearly thought it would be a keen keepsake to have a little card as a nodding reminder of my connection to her experience and journey on the Trace! The happy bit for me is using bookmarks from various authors inside new books as they arrive to be read — little fingerprints of reflections drift through my mind and heart, as I nestle into the story at hand, and for that, I am one very blessed and thankful book blogger!

Fun Stuff for Your Blog via pureimaginationblog.com

Book Synopsis:

An epic Elizabethan adventure with a thriller pace and a high tension love story that moves from the palaces of England to the savage wilderness of the New World.

Emme Fifield has fallen about as far as a gentlewoman can.

Once a lady-in-waiting to Queen Elizabeth, her only hope of surviving the scandal that threatens to engulf her is to escape England for a fresh start in the new America where nobody has ever heard of the Duchess of Somerset.

Emme joins Kit Doonan’s rag-tag band of idealists, desperados and misfits bound for Virginia. But such a voyage will be far from easy and Emme finds her attraction to the mysterious Doonan inconvenient to say the least.

As for Kit, the handsome mariner has spent years imprisoned by the Spanish, and living as an outlaw with a band of escaped slaves; he has his own inner demons to confront, and his own dark secrets to keep…

Ever since Sir Walter Raleigh’s settlement in Virginia was abandoned in 1587 its fate has remained a mystery; ‘The Lost Duchess’ explores what might have happened to the ill-starred ‘Lost Colony’ of Roanoke.

Author Biography:Jenny Barden

I’ve had a love of history and adventure ever since an encounter in infancy with a suit of armour at Tamworth Castle. Training as an artist, followed by a career as a city Jenny (Portrait 2)solicitor, did little to help displace my early dream of becoming a knight. A fascination with the Age of Discovery led to travels in South and Central America, and much of the inspiration for my debut came from retracing the footsteps of Francis Drake in Panama. The sequel centres on the first Elizabethan ‘lost colony’ of early Virginia. I am currently working on an epic adventure during the threat of invasion by the Spanish Armada.

My work has appeared in short story collections and anthologies and I’ve written for non-fiction publications including the Historical Novels Review. I am active in many organisations, having run the ‘Get Writing’ conferences for several years, and undertaken the co-ordination of the Historical Novel Society’s London Conference 2012. I am a member of that organisation as well as the Historical Writers’ Association, the Romantic Nevelists’ Association and the Society of Authors. I’ll be co-ordinating the RNA’s annual conference in 2014.

I have four children and now live on a farm in Dorset with my long suffering husband and an ever increasing assortment of animals.

I love travelling, art, reading and scrambling up hills and mountains (though I’m not so keen on coming down!).

Fun Stuff for Your Blog via pureimaginationblog.comA notation on Cover Art:

There are moments of great joy to discover a book cover as captivating as the one on The Lost Duchess. The moment you lock eyes with the woman who graces the page, you instinctively realise that you want to venture into her life and follow where she will lead. Her clothes are quite ornate, but it is the unexpected notice she is giving you that eludes the story will no doubt capture your full attention once it is begun to be consumed. She has a story to tell, and I knew that in combination with the book’s synopsis, this was a story I wanted to walk alongside her and know intimately.

There is a common debate I have noticed recently in the book blogosphere and the twitterverse, about the presumption of selection on the books we elect to read. One side claims it is by the book cover alone and the other side laments that it is on the merits of the story’s premise. I, on the other hand, have claimed to say:

Truly though, about why I am drawn into a book!? It goes directly into the heart of the narrative — I look for book synopsis which etch out a story-line full of heart & soul characters, who either need to go on a journey of discovery or are going to live through a life experience which will either shape them, break them, or transform them. Thinking back on my own young adult years — it was the story which took central focus – I have not changed my spots! My blog is aptly named as you get to know me! I might love a book cover, but I cannot love it fully unless I get a sense of the story within it – the cover is the shell, the heart of the joy in reading lies in the pages between the covers! -quoted from my comment on Ellen Mulholland’s blog

Mistress of the Sea by Jenny BardenFor you see, I may well fancy a book’s cover illustrations and artwork, but for me, if the book itself does not ink out a reason to savvy my interest and eyes to become enthralled with its contents, I am afraid I do not pick the book up irregardless of how much I might admit the cover is quite a remarkable piece of art. For to me, it is art then, and not a story of interest. I am not sure if the debate will ever be settled, but one thing I wanted to mention is how I appreciate book covers in successive order of release from authors have a ‘turning nod’ to each other. Case in point, is the début novel (Mistress of the Sea) by Ms. Barden (seen in this paragraph) whereupon the filigree edges and the atmosphere of colours selected against the backdrop are in tune with the cover for The Lost Duchess.

Previously, I observed the same keen attention given to the books of Stephanie Thornton, as I reviewed her second novel, Daughter of the Gods recently on another Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tour. The connectiveness in sequence and choice of design makes me smile inwardly, because the covers then become a bit of a triptych when viewed alongside each other (if there are three in sequence, such as the Daughter of Boston series by Julie Lessman). I like this attention to nuance detail and the methodology of selecting covers which help readers identify the collective work of an author when they go to borrow or purchase their books. I will need to remember to add notations each time I discover this amongst the books I read next, as it is one detail that I appreciate most.

Aside from period specific choices in clothing, as although I do not always realise when I am being duped by period designs and examples, there are moments where I have an inclination to feel that perhaps the clothing or manner of style on a cover is a bit of out time for the story it is attempting to reflect. Barden’s covers are an elegant grace in excellence and her tomes of work will delight all the senses a reader uses to soak into a novel’s heart.

Fun Stuff for Your Blog via pureimaginationblog.comMy Review of The Lost Duchess:

The Lost Duchess by Jenny BardenThe wide-eyed innocence of a maid-in-waiting to the Queen is ripped out of her bodice and attacked by a most vile individual who did not see Emme Fifield as a woman to respect and honour, but an object to possess. Her most tender courage of youthful spirit encapsulated her from the worst of the attack by muffling her angst ridden heart and the screams she would have belted to heaven if not in fear of the Queen, her liege in finding out the truth. Barden opens The Lost Duchess in such a powerful way as to beg the reader’s notice that what was once felt in locking eyes with Emme on the cover, now turns to an increasingly beguiling sense of knowing.

Her steadfast knowledge of a woman’s place in the Elizabethan age purported her plight, as she knew very well that if any person learnt of her disgrace of being attacked, the brunt of the burden would be solely placed on her shoulders. The rights of women then and the rights of women now are not so very far apart from each other when it comes to domestic violence and the collision of unwanted advances from men. Barden writ inside the passages following the attack a wholesome truth of the inner workings of a woman attempting to balance her reality of the incident against the reality of her place in court. Her life was a fragile balance of obligation, duty, and expected service to her Queen.

As we are gaining insight into her strength of character, we are seeing further into her courage as she decides to carry-on and forge ahead as though nothing sinister had occurred at all; as who is there to confide in when women are always viewed as being the harbingers of their own fate?

Emme is a woman who has vision outside the plight of her own circumstances, and on the confidence of the Secretary of State to Queen Elizabeth I, (Sir Francis Walsingham) she endeavours to change her stars by her own conviction and merit of industry by joining the voyage back to the New World. She knows her future is blighted at best if she stays behind to face the uncivilous rumours head-on, but to jump aboard ship and sail to Virginia? To help forge a colony in the Chesapeake that is stronger and sturdier than that of Roanoke?! I must confess, as her mind danced with images of fanciful new dreams and possibilities, I was alongside her rallying hope and encouragement for what this new beginning would mean to her well-being.

Besmirched with the tides of fate, Emme and Kit, the man entrusted to keep her safe aboard ship each have their own personal reasons for sailing for presumed sanctity in Virginia. As I had the pleasure of seeing Belle on the silver screen for my birthday this year, (a mere week ago) I could settle in my mind the joy of seeing a father acknowledge his child; a child of biracial origins and one he most earnestly loved. Reading the passages where Kit was attempting to explain to his brother the true reason he wanted to pursue a new life abroad warmed my heart, as foresaid Belle was only recently seen and has already stitched itself into my most beloved motion pictures of recent years; akin to Amazing Grace! I also appreciated the character of Manteo who is a Native amongst the Britons travelling to and fro the New World. He was given full respect for his person and I liked his ease in conversing with Emme, as he did not see her as others might and she was in full appreciation for the reprieve.

As their journey led them to the New World, so too did their adventure lead them to a rebirth of living with the full grace of freedom transformed. I appreciated the hearty realism stitched into life on ship as much as the curious details woven into the days in which they were ashore in Roanoke. Barden took a fissure of disjointed and fragmented history, and pulled together a pliable accountment of what ‘could have been’ but of which will quite surely ‘never truly be known’ of the ill-fated attempt to colonise Virginia at that point in time. I must commend her for her vision, as this particular slice of history always fascinated me in school, always thirsty for new details or curious scenarios of possibilities, and in reading The Lost Duchess, I find myself bemuseful of how this story could very well have a stock in reality.

The only bits that I found a bit disconcerning at times were the visual nature of some of the scenes, yet I did not attach a ‘fly in the ointment’ to this post because quite frankly they were very few and far between. They only entered a scene when needed to express the seriousness of an attack; especially a fatal one where someone was brutally murdered by Natives in Roanoke where the colonists were attempting to take residence. I flitted over the passages because within the whole of the book, my heart was enraptured with the evolving story between Emme and Kit, who are the heroes of the tale!

The wordsmith stylings of Barden’s narrative was rapturously exaulted:

I am forevermore blessed to have stumbled across such wonderful wordsmiths who enlighten our minds with words of which are not commonly used nor known in today’s literature. Even those words which would be harkened back to an age of the historical page in which the story entreats our imaginations to venture, not every author is able to knit the ties of that era in such a way as to unite a clarity of speech. I am always in a celebratory mood when I find a writer whose pen inks out a frothy amount of phrase, word, and era specific mentionings as to help alight us in the setting in which the story takes place. I feared not the moment I opened this particular novel, as between the Chapter Heading Quotation disclosures of passages taken from historical documents (I presume?) to engage our eye in the real characters behind the fictional story, to the benefit of the words in which grace the pages, my mind was lit afire with a truism of the Elizabethan Court!

She takes you inside this unknown world with such a propensity for details and enriched voices of the past, that you feel as though you are stepping directly into Emme’s shoes, casting footfalls where she alights in Richmond Palace as much as the shores of the New World. I found myself eating the words and pages as readily as my eyes were able to absorb their murmurings, because I had found another new author of whose story was soaking into my heart and that swelled a sea of thankfulness inside my heart! And, prompted a most curious thought as to seek out Mistress of the Sea!

A note on behalf of Ebury Press sustainability conscience:

On the reverse cover of The Lost Duchess, I was happily struck by the presence of the FSC recognisble label! I had mentioned their conservation efforts to source paper without hurting old growth forests on a previous post, as I am attempting to make a reference note of each book I read henceforth forward that has a mention inside its sleeves for stewardship and sustainable printing practices. More and more publishers (from major trade to independent press) are striving towards finding greener ways to print books and thereby, proving the point that those of us who can only read books in print can effectively read greener! A bit like how each of us who purchases second-hand books is taking a step towards the unnecessity of successive printings of the same novel. I applaud Ebury Press and Random House Group, Ltd. for being part of the forebearers of change and for giving all readers everywhere something to chew on about how reading green does not have to be electronically originated.

They mention briefly about their green-minded practices on their FAQ page, but go into greater detail on their page dedicated to how they acquire the paper for the books they bind into print editions. The best bit for me is seeing their green practices go a bit past paper production and more towards the whole concept of being a green publisher using green resources!

Fun Stuff for Your Blog via pureimaginationblog.comThis Book Review is courtesy of:

The Lost Duchess Virtual Book Tour with HFVBT

Fun Stuff for Your Blog via pureimaginationblog.comas I am happily honoured to be a blog tour hostess for:

Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours - HFVBTPlease visit my Bookish Events page to stay in the know for upcoming events!

Reader Interactive Question:

I am curious, what are your impressions of the ill-fated colony of Roanoke!? Have you sought out previous stories set amidst the rumours of unknown truths!? What do you think is plausible to explain the fact they were never found and that the search continues to today for their ancestors!? There is a lovely ‘Author’s Note’ in the back of “The Lost Duchess” which goes into a bit of detail to explain not only the author’s take on the history but how history is continuing being penned as the research continues to seek out the truth of what happened to the colony. I was grateful the passages were included as they tethered all the pieces together in both fiction and reality.

{SOURCES: Book covers for “The Lost Duchess” & “Mistress of the Sea”, Author Biography, Book Synopsis, and blog tour badges  were provided by HFVBT – Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours and used with permission. Author Interview badge provided by Parajunkee to give book bloggers definition on their blogs. Post dividers by Fun Stuff for Your Blog via Pure Imagination.}

Copyright © Jorie Loves A Story, 2014.

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Posted Friday, 20 June, 2014 by jorielov in 16th Century, Action & Adventure Fiction, Adulterous Affair, Blog Tour Host & Reviewer, Domestic Violence, Elizabethan Era, England, Green-Minded Publishers, High Seas Epic, Historical Fiction, Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours, Modern British Literature, Native American Fiction, Nautical Fiction, Queen Elizabeth I, Sir Francis Drake, Sir Francis Walsingham, Sir Walter Raleigh, Sustainability Practices inside the Publishing Industry, Sustainable Forest Certification, Trauma | Abuse & Recovery, Tudor Era, Virginia, Women of Power & Rule, Women's Rights, Wordsmiths & Palettes of Sage

+Blog Book Tour+ Seeing Green by Annabel Hertz Whilst engaged in the dialogue of #ThinkGreen & #EnvironmentalAdvocacy

Posted Thursday, 1 May, 2014 by jorielov , , 0 Comments

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Seeing Green by Annabel Hertz

Seeing Green Virtual Book Tour with JKS Communications

Published By: Self-Published, 15 April, 2014
Official Author Websites: Twitter | Facebook
Available Formats: Softcover
Page Count: 223

Converse on Twitter: #AnnabelHertz

Top Green Tags: #ThinkGreen, #ecofriendly, #greenpublishing, #sustainability

As much as I loved using: #EarthDay2014 & #EarthDay !!

Will be using: #EarthDayEveryday

Others include: #environment, #GoGreen, #Upcycle, #Recycle, #GreenGrowth

Fun Stuff for Your Blog via pureimaginationblog.com

Acquired Book By: I was selected to be a tour stop on the “Seeing Green” virtual book tour through JKS Communications: A Literary Publicity Firm. I received a complimentary copy of the book direct from JKS Communications, in exchange for an honest review. I did not receive compensation for my opinions or thoughts shared herein.

Fun Stuff for Your Blog via pureimaginationblog.comInspiring Speech on behalf of the Earth Summit of 1992:

Severn Cullis-Suzuki at Rio Summit 1992 via We Canada

Fun Stuff for Your Blog via pureimaginationblog.com

Book Synopsis:Seeing Green by Annabel Hertz

Drawing on clever social commentary and her own experience in the political realm, author Annabel Hertz will get readers “Seeing Green” in no time.

Her new book “Seeing Green” (April 15, 2014) steps into the world of cutthroat politics and environmental policy as seen through the eyes of a young multicultural woman whose personal life seems to parallel her professional life as an activist on the front-lines of Washington D.C. in the ’90s. Never afraid to articulate her personal convictions, Hertz’s modern day heroine is strong and profound, yet humorous and relatable.

Author Biography:

Annabel Hertz“Seeing Green” is Hertz’s first endeavor in historical fiction, much like the protagonist she introduces in “Seeing Green,” Hertz has delved into the world of politics with organizations involved in international relations and sustainable development. More recently, she served as a policy consultant, adjunct professor at the Geneva School of Diplomacy and International Relations and Global Governance Fellow at the World Economic Forum.

“Seeing Green” is Hertz’s debut novel. She holds master’s degrees from Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and San Francisco State University, as well as a bachelor’s degree from the University of California where she studied politics. Hertz is currently pursuing a doctorate in international relations at American University in Washington D.C.

Fun Stuff for Your Blog via pureimaginationblog.comMy thoughts on Environmental Concerns:

I do have a conscience heart for the environment which is why Seeing Green appeals to me! Ever since 5th grade (1989-90) as on take your parent to school day one of my classmates Dad came in to talk about environmental science, preservation, and activism! Combined with seeing Medicine Man that same year, you could say I was a natural environmental advocate! My early experience in getting into the dialogue of environmental concerns and progressive thoughts towards action, responsibility, and response has endeared me to the topic for life. It is a lot of motivation for a ten year old in other words! I have even seen my environmental heart bleed into my writing life, as most of the stories I write organically have a flowing stream of conscience interwoven into the on-going conversation on how best to conserve, preserve, reduce, recycle, and sustain our natural resources as much as the natural environment of the Earth’s ecosystem which sits quite fragile in the wake of our advances.

Previously, I hosted Sandra Leesmith (author of “Love’s Promises” which is an upcoming book review outside of her official blog tour) during a Cover Reveal post to help alert the word to readers of her next novel’s release. I appreciate taking part in these projects for authors as I am not only an advocate for certain causes but I am a true blue bookcheerleader to the level that if there is a book I feel passionately about I am quite eager to champion its cause on my blog! Ms. Leesmith returned to Jorie Loves A Story for an Author Interview which knitted together into a conjoined conversation about the environment and my own personal thoughts about green-minded publishing practices and the dedication of those in the industry who are already taking strides to green our books!

Regular readers, subscribers, and visitors of Jorie Loves A Story will start to see more blog posts dedicated to this vein of dialogue, thought, and supposition as it is a personal passion of mine as a reader, a book blogger, a patron of public libraries, and a citizen of Earth. There are already sub-focuses in place threaded into the heart of my blog (i.e. adoption stories in fiction, Children’s Literature, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Classical Literature, Inspirational Fiction Authors, etc) however this will evolve and turn into a new resource in my blog’s sidebar as I compile the links I am uncovering to help spread the word and empower readers, writers, and other enthused supporters of green-minded practices inside the publishing industry. You will also start to denote a new ‘category’ attached to my book reviews which will be “The Ecological Factor” which will give credence of recognition for books printed by green methods and/or produced with sustainability practices.

Likewise, before my blog’s official first birthday on 6th of August, 2014 I am hopeful to not only flesh out my sidebar to include more links than it already contains, but to keep them updated for bookish events stateside, throughout the Canadian Provinces, and around the world as I find the events which pique my own interest to attend if I were able to do so. I always encourage readers to contact me if they know of a link which would befit inclusion in my sidebar by either leaving me a blog comment on a post OR through using my Contact Form under “My Bookish Life“.

Jorie Loves A Story is truly a work-in-progress and as I grow in knowledge so too will my bookish blog! Always remember to scout out a sighting for “Related Articles” at the bottom of my posts as those are hand-selected by me, viewed & read prior to inclusion and are knitted to the topic or subject at hand. Each top menu of my blog has a supporting page (except for “Stories” as I swapped out “Home” for a word more relevant! although, if you hover you will find categories of ‘stories’ to click-over too!) as well as drop-down supporting categories to easily guide you on your way through my blog! Clouds for topics, subjects, genres, authors, and publishers are located in the lower portion of my sidebar for convenience.

As I expand into more topics on the environment I look forward to the ensuing conversations left in the comment threads and/or in tweets on Twitter! I am always humbled and grateful for each person who takes a moment to contact me and to extend the joy of what is being shared and discussed. My plan is also to seek out pro-positive and honest stories both in fiction and non-fiction which have an under-thread of environmental science or green-minded practices to help paint a positive light on a subject that is too oft-times controversial. Thank you for always being open to take the journey with me!

My Review of Seeing Green:

As I began the story inside Seeing Green, my mind instantly propelled me backwards into my own childhood’s eye of knowing fully the importance of Earth Summits and the ability to have world leaders openly discuss and talk about a pro-positive future for saving the environment as much as endeavouring to harness practices which will not continue to forsake natural resources. As a young girl I could see the fragility of the Earth simply by observation of the natural world outside the confines of my everyday wanderings. There are examples of the harshness humans can inflict on nature and on natural resources if you bend your eyes, heart, and mind towards viewing the natural environment through the eyes of those who inhabit the world outside our civilised cities and townes. The ecological ramifications are deeper than any of us could hope to emphatically understand yet within the hope of what we can achieve lies the greatest surge to rectify our mistakes and champion the wisdom from what we have learnt in their wake.

I should not have smirked in acknowledgement of a behest of disillusioned frustration towards America’s inability to take the bull by the horns on the global stage to initiate environmental protocols, but how could I not smirk? Herein the smirk refers to growing up in a country bent towards change but hindered by the ability to make change happen in a way that is not only feasible but truly with the best intentions backed by the knowledge of how to properly put the right changes into action. A murmuring echo of a conversation I had with a German friend of mine and myself had around the Christmastide a few years back came startling back into focus as we had a rather hearty debate by how in the infancy of my country, her country had already triumphed such remarkable strides towards true green living practices such as a non-waste ordinance in cities to recycle all glass bottles – whether in the privacy of your house or out in the errands of your life. Recycle bins are as viable and visible as rubbish bins, which I could sympathise with as that was one of my dreams for my own future whilst living with the knowledge that progress takes a slower road towards the change she felt was second nature.

I had to nod in recognition of the fact that women’s fashion designs have completely jumped the rails as far as what a true woman’s figure actually can hold within its being! At 18, I was plumb aghast, appalled, and properly gobsmacked by how fashion had altered its perception of real women and real bodies, whilst attempting to compartmentalise all of us into a cookie-cutter blueprint which does not exist in the real world. I hope all women rock the creative out-of-box mentality I have done in seeking femininity in a world bent against the true essence of the woman divine.

I loved Arcani’s Aunt Lilian’s sense of knowing how to uplift her niece’s spirits even without knowing the full details of what stressed her to the brink of needing a cup of comfort and love. The novel is writ with a no nonsense approach of being true to self-identity as much as understanding ethnicity from a new perspective of a modern woman making her way in the worlds whilst holding onto the elements of what make her whole as a Native American. Owning her heritage and marvelling at how her sister Caroline would fail a test if asked of her Hopi roots.

Arcani herself is lit afire by an intense desire to help the Earth and to pull back the excessive need of humanity’s drive towards consumption and exploitation of viable natural resources. Through her eyes we are taken back to a near-future outlook in the 1990s where hope was a thin determined line towards socioeconomic change in a lack of green-minded initiation. She sees the world as a half empty glass of exhausted lost causes through the apathy and stagnation she observes by how everyday life and the errands therein function. Her anguish over knowing her heart’s calling and the inclination of obstinate opposition deflects her rage but reaffirms her grit in rising above the stacked challenges to make a difference in a world bent against anything changing at all.

Her reconnection to her parent’s origins and the roots of her history as a Hopi were explored as she returned to where her parents had once lived. By going back to find a semblance of what once was she started to reveal bits of her authentic self and in so doing, enabled her to move forward towards a future that would be decided on her terms; not on the wanton hopes of others. She even found a soothsayer whose wisdom painted a calming balm of grandfatherly love around her shoulders which was ached for as a connection of the heart. His guidance allowed her to see what was blocked to her before their encounter: at times when a blockage of progress cannot be released due to a conflict which is not easily resolved, one must seek the middle way of eclipsing the muddlement of stasis. Life provides us with an innate ability to determine our own fate whilst giving us the opportunity to impact the lives of those we endeavour to protect by changing the way in which we live today.

 

On how far we still have yet to go:

Extending out of my second paragraph of my review of Seeing Green, I wanted to empathsis that there are communities and towneships already riding on the wave of progress towards a viable augmentation of pro-ecological and environmental change. Communities which support the locovore and slow food movements to discourage the trucking of fresh fruit and veg outside of a window of 100 miles. Communities which ignite a fever of hope by helping make recycling resources available to everyone either by curbside pick-up bins or by implementing the recycling bins at key sites in close proximity to where neighbourhoods can commute. Rainwater collection bins on the outside of homes are replacing the excessive use of water tapped from city or county water lines as residents find new ways to adapt to water shortages whilst enabling them freedom to water more often for their personal needs.

Homeless shelters and missions are implementing self-sustaining practices by growing tracts of organic and/or non-chemical crops to not only feed their own but to outsource the surplus to gain back a living wage to those in need of it most. Community co-ops for health food, local produce, and local / state made products are sprouting up to take place of national green-grocers who cannot always serve the locality sector as well or with as many benefits to local trade and commerce. Local forest and park officers are finding non-chemical ways of treating insect pests and protecting local water resources such as lake, stream, river, and estuaries from being cross-contaminated. Solar powered rubbish and recycle bins are being inserted around downtown centers of business to help encourage pedestrians to pitch wiser and with a green heart in mind.

Certain restaurants and eateries are backing away from using takeaway containers which have no recycle or reusable value to them by implementing the use of those that can be turnt back in for a second use. Electric car recharging stations are being sourced and built to give hybrid or full electric car drivers a place to ‘fill their tank’ around county or city buildings. It is easier to compost and reuse kitchen waste than it was say twenty years ago, as much as finding green friendly building supplies, personal hygiene products, house cleaning products, and every imaginable ‘product’ that a person could use in their everyday life.

There are a myriad of changes occurring right now in all our local communities both known or unknown which are creating positive strides towards a better tomorrow. All change is codependent on our own ability to implement the changes we can in our own lives which in effect inspire others to do the same. The ones that I have shared are either in place in my local community and/or are in place in communities around the nation in which I personally know of being practiced.

Yet, despite this turning tide perspective of how far we have come, there is still a heap of work left to do towards creating a greener space for all of us to thrive and build a stronger future for everyone yet bourne. We have to stay resilient and mindful of new ways in which to sustain ourselves and our local communities, not only for food but for water. We have to continue to think outside the box, and find ways to help our neighbours and those in our community who need our assistance. It came be as simple as giving a person a ride who cannot find one otherwise to taking someone to the local farmer’s market to source local produce. It is by finding ways to have local plots available for residents to keep herbs and veg for their own needs as much as finding ways to keep our footprint a bit lighter as we walk through our journey.

We have to be respectful of how far we have come but not to become stagnant and believe that is all we can achieve. It is to keep the dialogue in motion and by instilling the proper hope and belief to everyone coming up behind us that change is a living entity that resides in each of us. Each person can effectively change one singular act of environmental conservation and preservation.

And, this book blogger in particular is encouraged by seeing print books becoming greener with each year non-old growth forest paper is sourced, veg & soy inks are replacing harsher chemicals, and the bindings of books is created using materials which do not destroy more than what we can replace in a kinder more renewing way towards sustainability. Some might advocate for less print books, but for each person who reads electronically may they realise that not every reader can read on a digitalised screen and those of us who read strictly in print format are championing the printers and publishers who are leading the charge for a greener world of literature!

Fly in the Ointment:

I do believe I caught a copy-edit error on page 17, as there is mention of a 2002 model of a car when I believe we were still in the present year of 1992? Normally I shake off a copy-edit error, but in this instance it threw me for a bit of a loop except the rest of the paragraph was most decidedly not taking place in 2002!

Elsewhere I found the minor inclusions of vulgarity to be a bit tame until of course the worst word I think that is oft used too readily for my particular tastes made its first appearance on page 18. As outlined in previous ‘Fly in the Ointments’ I am not one who condones the use of vulgarity to the level of extensiveness as some novels have the tendency of doing. One exception to this preference of mine was ‘Etched On Me‘ which is in a different category altogether in of its own. I transcended the language barrier by finding myself intrigued by Arcani as a character and as a woman struggling to find her feet in environmental advocacy and activism. Her character’s spirit shines strong and is one character I found myself overlooking using words which inwardly make me cringe.

I was a bit puzzled by how a novel written about the environment did not include any disclosure or stamp of sustainable print sources for the paper or for the production of the book. In fact, I nearly felt I had received an ARC except that there isn’t a disclaimer towards this end anywhere I could find inside the book or outside of it. I claimed this as a ‘self-published’ novel due to the fact the only markings of how it exists is the copyright notice (simply a statement of year) and a brief biography of Annabel Hertz on the last page of the novel itself. It is the very first novel I have ever picked up which does not list a Library of Congress listing nor does it have anything between the cover page and the author’s biography except the text of the story itself. It is a bare bones edition which intrigued me to say the least.

Fun Stuff for Your Blog via pureimaginationblog.com

Severn Cullis-Suzuki returns to Rio 20 years after stopping the world via Green Cross

Fun Stuff for Your Blog via pureimaginationblog.comThis book review is courtesy of:

Seeing Green Virtual Book Tour with JKS Communications

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Seeing Green
by Annabel Hertz
Source: Direct from Publicist

Places to find the book:

Add to LibraryThing

Genres: Biological Diversity, Ecology, Literary Fiction, Science, Science & Technology


Published by Self Published Author

on 15th April, 2014

Format: Paperback

Pages: 223

Reader Interactive Question: I am most curious to hear what impression of environmental advocacy and/or environmental protection you grew up with during your own generation inasmuch to see your thoughts on eco-friendly innovations in the comment threads. I welcome the conversation to take on its own thread of interest and to keep a green-minded forum of open exchange on various posts as I move forward with environmental focused book reviews and blog posts. I was a bit surprised by how much I have to share on my own behalf, but I sometimes note that there are certain books whose topic of focus re-fuel our own passions and give us a platform to express of thoughts and opinions. I’d be keen to learn which books (either fiction or non-fiction) on the topic at hand would be recommended for me to seek out to read next after my reading of “Seeing Green”!?

{SOURCES: Book cover for “Seeing Green”, author photograph of Annabel Hertz, author biography & book synopis (taken from the Press Kit) were provided by JKS Communications and used with permission. Severn Cullis-Suzuki lectures via We Canada & Green Cross had either URL share links or coding which made it possible to embed this media portal to this post, and I thank them for the opportunity to share more about this novel and the author who penned it. Blog Tour badge provided by Parajunkee to give book bloggers definition on their blogs. Post dividers by Fun Stuff for Your Blog via Pure Imagination.}

Copyright © Jorie Loves A Story, 2014.

Reading this book contributed to these challenges:

  • Go Indie
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Posted Thursday, 1 May, 2014 by jorielov in 21st Century, Blog Tour Host & Reviewer, Bookish Discussions, Bookish Films, Debut Author, Debut Novel, Earth Summit, Eco-Friendly, Ecology, Environmental Activism, Environmental Advocacy, Environmental Conscience, Environmental Science, Equality In Literature, Fly in the Ointment, Green Publishing, Green-Minded Publishers, Green-Minded Social Awareness, Indie Author, Interviews Related to Content of Novel, JKS Communications: Literary Publicity Firm, Judaism in Fiction, Native American Fiction, Political Narrative & Modern Topics, Preservation, Social Change, Sustainability & Ecological Preservation, Sustainability Practices inside the Publishing Industry, Upcycle & Recycle Practices, Vulgarity in Literature, Yiddish Words & Phrases