Tag: Henry James

+2014 Chunkster Reading Challenge+ Or, how Jorie <3s novels of hearty depth!

Posted Monday, 17 February, 2014 by jorielov , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , 5 Comments

2014 Chunkster Challenge hosted by Vasilly

I, must admit, I am always quite curious about the books I gravitate towards reading time after time. Do I pick a specific genre to explore!? Is there a particular heart of depth to the stories I am selecting?! Is there any specifics that would stand out!? Setting?! Time preference!? Locale!? Or, could it be that I, Jorie of Jorie Loves A Story have a natural curiosity and eye bent towards falling in love with novels of hearty depth! What the rest of the world considers a ‘chunkser’ I consider “Now! That’s what I call a wicked sweet tome of a novel!”

Although I have seen posts attributed to this particular reading challenge over the past few years, I was always curious about the length requirements of the reader’s choices!? Apparently, any novel over the mark of 450 pages is considered a ‘chunkster’ by the broader readership! I consider anything under 750 pages to be a full-fledged novel of wickedly delightful sagas! Then, again, I happen to have a penchant for reading multi-generational sagas, of which cannot be fully contained in one singular volume! I oft find the sagas are separated into multiples; either in a running serial of the same family &/or spilt into trilogy installments. The odd quartet is thrown in for good measure as well!

I am a reader who envelops her mind, her heart, and her soul around the characters she meets inside the stories her mind illuminates for her as she reads. The main characters as well as the supporting characters all have equal footing in her heart because each of the characters mentioned may hold a piece of the evolving story. Or at the very least, provide a backdrop flow of continuity for the time, setting, and place of the novel! I love seeing the smaller details, the finer points of everyday hours which elapse at different intervals whilst your engrossed into a hearty historical inasmuch as you might be jettisoning into a time slip or time travel narrative! I like seeing the finite details because they in of themselves give a winking nod towards our own histories. How life was for those who came before us in the not-so-far-off past can be ruminated in a historical story.

This wicked sweet challenge is hosted by Vasilly of Chunkster Challenge!

{Proposed Goal of Reading *25* Chunksters}

Given the rate of probability of increasing my page counts as the months progress forward, I have decided to aim even higher than I originally felt I could achieve over the next 10 months, as I am beginning to count this challenge in the second month rather than the first! And, at the latter half of February, I might add! I originally felt only five novels of considerable length might be possible! Who knew!? I suppose this would fall under the ‘hidden talent’ category for performance artists!?

{Reading List} | Combination of Blog Tour Reviews & Personal Selections

IF a book is in italics I have bumped it into 2015 rather than reading it in 2014.

  1. Crown of Vengeance {Book 1: Fires of Eden series} by Stephen Zimmer (612 pages)
  2. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy (1,215 pages)
  3. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bront√ę (643 pages)
  4. Somerset by Leila Meacham {Prequel to Roses} (610 pages)
  5. Roses by Leila Meacham (609 pages)
  6. Tumbleweeds by Leila Meacham (470 pages)
  7. The Ambitious Madame Bonaparte by Ruth Hill Chatlien (484 pages)
  8. Labyrinth by Kate Mosse (528 pages)* officially on hold for another year
  9. Sepulchre by Kate Mosse (592 pages)* officially on hold for another year
  10. Citadel by Kate Mosse (680 pages)
  11. The Reincarnationist (Book 1: Reincarnationist series) by M.J. Rose* (464 pages)
  12. The Memorist (Book 2: Reincarnationist series) by M.J. Rose* (464 pages)
  13. A Beauty So Rare by Tamera Alexander* (480 pages)
  14. [7,851 pages thus far!]
  15. Intangible by C.A. Gray (482 pages)
  16. Awesome Jones by AshleyRose Sullivan (456 pages)

{In consideration} | A considerable number are on my tCC List!

[projected pages to read: 8,498!]

  1. Leviathan Wakes by James S.A. Corey (582 pages)
  2. Jaran {Book 1: Sword of Heaven series} by Kate Elliott (494 pages)
  3. The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton (834 pages)
  4. The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak (552 pages)
  5. Firefly Lane by Kristin Hannah (479 pages)
  6. The Forgotten Garden by Kate Morton (552 pages)
  7. The House at Riverton by Kate Morton (473 pages)
  8. The Distant Hours by Kate Morton (562 pages)
  9. The Portrait of a Lady by Henry James (656 pages)
  10. The Thorn Birds by Colleen McCullough (704 pages)
  11. The Crimson Petal & the White by Michael Faber (on TBR Challenge List) (833)
  12. Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell (1,024 pages)
  13. Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray (753)

{Previously Read}

[Pages thus far consumed: 1,548 & counting!]

  1. The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker (486 pages)
  2. King’s Dragon {Book 1: Crown of Stars saga} by Kate Elliott (532)
  3. The Shell Seekers by Rosamunde Pilcher (530)
  4. and continuing,.. as I sort out which books were of considerable length!

{*} reading in conjunction with scheduled book review of next in sequence

Already at the start of keeping track of the length of each novel I read, I am amazed at how the list begins with *13!* Curiously, I am fascinated to seeing which ‘length’ of book attracts me the most!? If spilt into 100 page increments, will it be the 400 mark? 500? I’ll have to continue this part of the discussion come New Year’s Eve, 2015!

*UPDATE (18FEB’14): As I read Christine’s note about how many actual pages I’d consume, I was curious, how many would that be!? I added the figures!

{SOURCE: Jorie Loves A Story Badge created by Ravven with edits by Jorie in PicMonkey.

Copyright © Jorie Loves A Story, 2014.

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Posted Monday, 17 February, 2014 by jorielov in Blogosphere Events & Happenings, Bookish Discussions, Chunkster Reading Challenge, Classical Literature, Debut Novel, Fantasy Fiction, Gothic Literature, Historical Fiction, Inspirational Fiction & Non-Fiction, Library Find, Literary Fiction, Reading Challenges, Romance Fiction, Science Fiction

+Reading Challenge+ Back to the Classics 2014!

Posted Sunday, 5 January, 2014 by jorielov , , , , , , , , , , 10 Comments

Hosted by Books & Chocolate karensbooksandchocolate blogspot.inOn the same vein of itching to join The Classics Club, I have been an appreciator from afar of “Back to the Classics” reading challenge, which this year, has a new hostess: Books and Chocolate! Whilst I know most are going to have cross-relating books per each challenge they commit to completing, I wanted to take a different track and pick out books that would be insular to each individual challenge! Therefore, the books you will see as my selections here will not be cross-referenced nor cross-applied to my tCC list!

Rules Specific to this Challenge: {taken from the official blurb!}

  • All books must be read in 2014. ¬†Books started prior to January 1, 2014 are not eligible. ¬†Reviews must be linked by December 31, 2014.
  • E-books and audiobooks are eligible! Books can count for other challenges you may be working on. However, books may NOT crossover categories within this challenge.You may NOT count the same book twice for different categories in this challenge.
  • If you do not have a blog, you may link your review from Goodreads or other publicly accessible online format.
  • Please sign up for the challenge using the linky below BEFORE MARCH 1, 2014. ¬†Please link to your sign-up announcement post (if possible/applicable).
  • You do not have to list your books prior to starting the challenge, but it is more fun that way. :) You can always change your list at any time. You can read the books in any order (including mixing in the optional categories at any time).
  • You can decide to attempt the optional categories at any point (you can also bow out of the optional categories at any point as well).
  • Please identify the categories you’ve read in your wrap-up post so that I can easily add up your entries for the prize drawing! Adding links within the post would also be greatly appreciated.
  • Main Stipulation: *ALL* stories read are only considered a ‘classic’ if published prior to 1964!

Required:

  1. A 20th Century Classic
  2. A 19th Century Classic
  3. A Classic by a Woman Author
  4. A Classic in TranslationIf English is not your primary language, then books originally published in English are acceptable.  You could also read the book in its original language if you are willing and able to do so.
  5. A Classic About War2014 will be the 100th anniversary of the beginning of World War I. ¬†Any book relating to a war is fine — WWI, WWII, the French Revolution, the War of the Worlds — your choice.
  6. A Classic by an Author Who Is New To You This can be any author whose works you have not read before. ¬†It doesn’t necessarily have to be an author you’ve never heard of.
Optional Categories:
  1. An American Classic
  2. A Classic Mystery, Suspense or Thriller 
  3. A Historical Fiction Classic. This is any classic set at least 50 years before the time when it was written. For example, Margaret Mitchell published Gone with the Wind 70 years after the end of the Civil War; therefore, it is considered a historical novel. A Tale of Two Cities and The Scarlet Letter are also historical novels. However, older classicsset during the period in which they were writtenare not considered historical; for example, the novels of Jane Austen.
  4. A Classic That’s Been Adapted Into a Movie or TV Series. ¬†Any period, any genre! ¬†This is practically a free choice category. ¬†However, it’s a separate category than the required categories.
  5. Extra Fun Category: ¬†Write a Review of the Movie or TV Series adapted from Optional Category #4. ¬†This should be some kind of posting reviewing the book read for the previous optional category above. ¬†It can be any adaptation — does not have to be adapted before 1964. ¬†For example, if you chose Pride and Prejudice as your the optional classic above,you could review any adaptation — 1940, 1980, 1995, 2005, etc. These two optional categories go together, but this must¬†be a separate blog posting — no fair just mentioning it in the book review!

Shabby Blogs

And, Jorie’s choices are as follows:

Curious or no, there appears to be a slight bent towards reading classical crime fiction this year, as nearly every single book which leapt out at me to read falls under this particular category of fiction! I have wanted to focus on classical noir fiction as well as crime, but sometimes I suppose the day you set down to write down a list for reading challenge, you can surprise yourself by your responses to the ‘fill-in-the-blank’ spaces!! Alas, the Hitchcokian girl is showing her preference for suspense!

Required:

  1. A 20th Century Classic:
    The Poisoned Chocolates Case by Anthony Berkeley Cox {1929}

    {classic detective fiction}
  2. A 19th Century Classic: *The Way We Live Now* by Anthony Trollope (considering)
  3. A Classic by a Woman Author:
    The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson {1959}
  4. A Classic in Translation: {reading in January!}
    “Au Bonhear des Dames” | The Ladies Paradise by Emile Zola {1883}*
  5. A Classic About War:
    The Riddle of the Sands by Erskine Childers {1903}
    {influenced espionage & spy fiction}
  6. A Classic by an Author Who Is New To You:
    Strangers on a Train by Patricia Highsmith {1950}

{*} By a sweet happy coincidence, I happened to have placed a purchase request for “The Ladies Paradise” prior to joining Back to the Classics! I hadn’t connected the dots to the book and author, until Karen kindly left me a note on this post! You see, I was wrapped up in the memory of seeing Episode 3 I believe it was on Masterpiece Theater!? I hadn’t realised a new BBC drama was already in-progress, and whilst recognising the quality, I immediately looked up the drama after the episode concluded! This led me to realise that we didn’t have a copy of this book in our card catalogue (hence the request!)!! Quite a fortuitous strike of luck, eh?

  1. An American Classic:
    The Postman Always Rings Twice by James M. Cain {1934}
  2. A Classic Mystery, Suspense or Thriller:
    The Ambassadors by Henry James {1903}
    {inspired: The Talented Mr. Ripley}
  3. A Historical Fiction Classic:
    The Bridge of San Luis Rey by Thorton Wilder {1927}
    {takes place in 1714}
  4. A Classic That’s Been Adapted Into a Movie or TV Series: The Talented Mr. Ripley by Patricia Highsmith¬†{1955}
  5. Extra Fun Category:  Write a Review of the Movie or TV Series adapted from Optional Category #4: The Talented Mr. Ripley {starring Matt Damon, 1999}

{SOURCE: A selection of buttons, dividers, and blog decorative freebies were chosen from the Shabby Blogs blog OR from Shabby Blogs website; such as the button post divider. Jorie Loves A Story badge created by Ravven with edits by Jorie in PicMonkey.}

Copyright © Jorie Loves A Story, 2014.

Related Articles:

1000 Books Everyone Must Read – (theguardian.com)

100 Best Novels – (modernlibrary.com)

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Posted Sunday, 5 January, 2014 by jorielov in 19th Century, 20th Century, Back to the Classics, Classical Literature, Crime Fiction, Gothic Mystery, Hard-Boiled Mystery, Reading Challenges, Suspense