Tag: D. Grant Fitter

+Blog Book Tour+ City of Promises by D. Grant Fitter

Posted Friday, 9 May, 2014 by jorielov , , 0 Comments

Parajunkee Designs

City of Promises by D. Grant Fitter

City of Promises Virtual Tour by Historical Fiction Virtual Tours

Published By: Self-Published, 22 January, 2013
Official Author Websites: Site | Twitter | Facebook
Available Formats: Paperback & E-Book
Page Count: 370

Converse on Twitter: #CityOfPromisesTour

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Acquired Book By:

I was selected to be a tour stop on the “City of Promises” virtual book tour through Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours. I received a complimentary copy of the book direct from the author D. Grant Fitter, in exchange for an honest review. I did not receive compensation for my opinions or thoughts shared herein.

Inspired to Read:

When City of Promises came available to tour with Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours, I must confess, I was teetering on the edge of saying ‘yes’ to accept this book for review. My only hesitation was due to the fact that I have been to Mexico City and therefore, was uncertain if I could return to a fictional account of the city and maintain my memories of her in the ensuing decades since this particular sliver of the city’s history takes place. In the end, I decided that if I can handle reading about the Jazz Age in America as much as Prohibition and the upturnt tides of Chicago & New York City’s histories, can I can surely handle reading what happened in Mexico City! After all, when I was there the city was undergoing a bit of a Renaissance, in an attempt to re-strengthen the city’s identity as much as to re-define the city itself. It was the heart of the story given inside the premise that pulled at me, and for which I am most anxious to see where the corridors of this particular historical fiction will take me! I am always eager to traverse into the passageways of history that might not always lend a happy ending but will lend itself a portal glimpse into a part of history that needs to be told.

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City of Promises by D. Grant Fitter}: Book Synopsis :{

Is there an economic value of one’s soul? “By divine good fortune I live in the most glamorous era of a famously enticing city. By obscene misfortune I’m shut out by its ruling elite.” Daring ways to make it big are on offer in Mexico City in the 1940s, but best watch your back! If Arturo Fuentes barters virtue to maneuver in on the action, will the consequence of his choices be too much to bear?

The rebirth of one of the world’s most colorful cities forms the rich backdrop for this historically discerning tale of treachery, intrigue and political corruption.

“My entire family was stuck for generations in that isolated village south of Veracruz where I was born. When you’re fourteen, know you are a dreamer and learn to be a schemer, you can’t stay and so you start planning for the day.”

In 1941, 21-year-old Arturo Fuentes followed the beat to Mexico City.

Bottles of rum in smoke filled bars, sultry women and impassioned conversation, music and bright show lights calling. Murder and corruption.

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D. Grant FitterAuthor Biography:

D. Grant Fitter is a citizen of North America. Born in Ontario, Canada and educated in Colorado, USA, he is convinced he was Mexican in his previous life. How else to explain such a strong attraction to Mexico and all things Mexican, including his wife.

His business career includes long stints of work in Mexico before yielding to a pesky urge to pursue freelance journalism for seventeen years. Meanwhile, Fitter’s Mexican roots continued to call. City of Promises is the product of his curiosity to understand why the culture of our close neighbors is so distant from our own.

He lives in Toronto and whenever possible, in a sunny hillside casita in the colonial town of Taxco, Guerrero.

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Mexico & Mexico City in the 1940s:

By all accounts of how Fitter paints the view of Mexico City in the 1940s, there is not much of a difference between life south of the border than it was being lived north of it. A lot of similarities run deep between both countries need for fast living and alcoholic numbing of entertainment exploits. There is a sinister undertone due to how the city is run and how the pulse of who is keeping track of what everyone is up too arcs into a deeper cognition that freedom can become a price too high to pay if your not willing to play by the game already set in motion.

My Review of City of Promises:

I believe what surprised me the most (outside of the style of how the story is told) is how explosive the action occurs with nearly only a faint whisper of acknowledgement. Normally when I am reading a crime centered novel, the action of the crime takes precedence over the character’s journey. In this novel, what I found interesting is that it is the journey of Arturo’s character which is weighted to have more girth to draw a light around than the actual loss of his girlfriend in such a manner as to be repulsive and malicious yet delicate and withdrawn of emotion.

Arturo is a man who wants to become self-made and influential on his own terms, but he is caught inside how territorial his objectives interfere with others who plan to work against his best intentions. We are jettisoned out of the immediate action in the first Chapters and alighted in step with his motivations to offset the instability of his glass company which took a setback when murder arrived at his company’s door. Each step he takes forward, he is inadvertently withdrawing backwards as his actions are thwarted and abated by forces yet known.

The insertion of travel by rails excited me, as I was always attracted to the old fashioned ways of transportation, including having ridden on railways myself as time allowed. The pace of life for Arturo shifts between relaxed enjoyment and bustling vigor when he moves between the world of business and personal comfort. I appreciated the well of history interwoven into the story as much as the necessary ordinary details of placing my mind’s eye in the setting of where City of Promises is set. Fitter gives you enough of a pause to question the motives of most of the characters you are being introduced too, as how to know which character possesses an honest heart and which one has desires that could be less than sincere? Arturo is a man who follows his instincts and does not all0w himself to dawdle in worry or vexation on any blight of woe that crosses his path. He’s forthright and determined to create his own future and his own way of commerce sustainability.

The nightlife in Mexico during the 1940s had as much flair and passion as they had whilst I was visiting in the 1990s, although I took in a tamer version of the dancing offerings as I enjoyed the Flamingo dancers whose eloquence transfixed my eyes and heart. City of Promises illuminates the Rumba and the sensuality of its dancers in comparison to its observers who are caught in the bewitching allure of its dance. Life was lived large in the 1940s where carefree attitude was equally matched with entertainment to cure desire.

In conflict with sorting out his business affairs and following his pursuit of indulgence by way of sultry company, Arturo always came across to me as a man in a proper conflict between the life he dreamt of as a boy and the life he was living as a man. Part of him wanted to live the life of comfort, where desire superseded necessity of work, and the other half of his soul lended itself to being focused on acquisition of prosperity. His classic misstep was not in realising what his own heart desired most for himself. In realising what could provide him with true happiness outside of the scheme of acquiring more wealth and more status. How he could spend his days and hours, fully content and achieve a measure of joy which did not have to be bought, bartered, or exchanged. This is a story of one man’s quest to understand how life is meant to be lived.

Fly in the Ointment:

At first my footing in the novel was a bit off-center, as the flashback is the story itself and the present is taking place in a sort of interrogation between the main protagonist and an investigator. What throw me for a bit of a loop is the insertion of the dialogue exchange between the two gentlemen and the narration of the story being overlayed and cross-sected into each other without a definitive breaking to denote one setting from the other outside of the text being in italics. Once you get a bit further along, you start to see the reasoning for the interruptions as the story is unfolding out of Arturo’s memory and encompassing how he wants to relay what knowledge he has to the police. It’s a unique perspective and one that started to take on its own rhythm. I am unsure if a prompt of a paragraph ahead of Chapter 1 would have eased this for a reader who unsuspecting of the slippings of present time and remembered action would have felt less unsettling. Such as you might find in a Prologue ahead of delving into the heart of the story itself.

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Blog Book Tour Stop, courtesy of Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours

City of Promises Virtual Tour via Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours

Previously I showcased an Author’s Guest Post by Mr. Fitter

on his inspiration behind the story!

Check out my upcoming bookish events to see what I will be hosting next for

Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours - HFVBTand mark your calendars!

{SOURCES: “City of Promises” Book Cover, synopsis, tour badge, author photograph and HFVBT badge were provided by Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours and were used by permission. Blog Tour badge provided by Parajunkee to give book bloggers definition on their blogs. Post dividers by Fun Stuff for Your Blog via Pure Imagination.}

Copyright © Jorie Loves A Story, 2014.

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Posted Friday, 9 May, 2014 by jorielov in 20th Century, Blog Tour Host, Crime Fiction, Debut Author, Debut Novel, Equality In Literature, Fly in the Ointment, Geographically Specific, Historical Fiction, Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours, Mexico City, Suspense, the Forties

+Author Guest Post+ The author of “City of Promises” examines what implored him to write about Mexico City in the 1940s!

Posted Wednesday, 7 May, 2014 by jorielov , , 0 Comments

Guest Post by Parajunkee

D. Grant Fitter

Proposed Topic: I am most curious how the Mexico City of the 1940s captured your imagination to bring it bustling to life in “City of Promises” as much as the undercurrent of the story led you to create Arturo? Were you inspired to resurrect this particular age of Mexico City’s history from your research pursuits or was it due to spending time in the city itself? How did “City of Promises” alight in your mind’s eye and how did it change you after you wrote its story? 

I elected to enquire about City of Promises originally as I have fond memories of my week in Mexico, where I not only discovered the delights of the Federal District of Mexico City, but I found a lifeblood and infusion of culture, food, and a diverse collection of Mayan artifacts and architectural history etched into the legacy of their ruins. I fell in love with the ambiance of how relaxed the Mexicans approach life and how enthused they are to live each day not only to the fullest, but enriched by community, family, and food. They remind me a bit of Tuscany and Sicily, where families center their lives around the dinner table and/or thereto otherwise where food plays a center role in the gathering. There are others of course who believe in this as most of Europe approaches life in a similar vein, but I wanted to highlight Italy as like Mexico, there is such a passionate vibe towards earthen foods rooted in their local environment and in the stitchings of passed down recipes from one generation to another. The fusion of herbs in mixtures different than their European counterparts was nothing short of divine consumption on my part! I loved seeing how they would gather together their flavours and how elements like pink onions add dimension to open-faced grilled chicken fajitas and a root vegetable which tastes like a sweet potato can be transformed into a delish offering for breakfast!

I might not have been a cook when I was in Mexico, but I exited the country with a heart full of Mexican cuisine and a distinct taste for true Mexicali cooking!! I have not once since my travels there found a chef or restaurant who understands the local produce and infusions of Mexican cookery to whet my palette like the places I ate whilst I was there. Aside from the ready allure of food, what struck me was the remnants of living history in each street and historical site you visited, because modern Mexicans live amongst the ruins and the historical artifacts which have withstood time and weather. When I write my post about this novel for review on Friday, I shall include a bit of an antidote about being in the Yucatán and my first impression of Uxmal!

For you could say, part of me has remained curious about Mexico and about the legacies of the Mayans since my wanderings in the mid-1990s. My attachment to the 1940s in America and France grew out of my love of the Jazz Age and Flappers in pre & post war eras where life was set to a different beat and mindset. I was then further curious about how Mr. Fitter was inspired to enchant us with this tale!

City of Promises by D. Grant Fitter}: Book Synopsis :{

Is there an economic value of one’s soul? “By divine good fortune I live in the most glamorous era of a famously enticing city. By obscene misfortune I’m shut out by its ruling elite.” Daring ways to make it big are on offer in Mexico City in the 1940s, but best watch your back! If Arturo Fuentes barters virtue to maneuver in on the action, will the consequence of his choices be too much to bear?

The rebirth of one of the world’s most colorful cities forms the rich backdrop for this historically discerning tale of treachery, intrigue and political corruption.

“My entire family was stuck for generations in that isolated village south of Veracruz where I was born. When you’re fourteen, know you are a dreamer and learn to be a schemer, you can’t stay and so you start planning for the day.”

In 1941, 21-year-old Arturo Fuentes followed the beat to Mexico City.

Bottles of rum in smoke-filled bars, sultry women and impassioned conversation, music and bright show lights calling. Murder and corruption.

 

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How Mexico & the 1940s inspired this story from the author 

Fun Stuff for Your Blog via pureimaginationblog.comI am so glad to be invited to post on Jorie’s blog as part of my Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tour. So far, there has been great reviews from bloggers who have read City of Promises on this tour and today I welcome the opportunity to talk briefly about the background behind what reviewers have been calling unique, dazzling, vivid and captivating.

As blogger/reviewer Ashley LaMar of Close the Cover said earlier this week, “The 1940’s Mexico City setting is fantastic! It’s unique, mesmerizing and vibrant allowing readers to easily fall in love with the locale and understand the excitement of young Arturo who left the country behind in order to seek his fortune under the lights of the big city”, as quoted from her book review of “City of Promises”.

So how is it that such an unusual place as 1940s Mexico City captured my imagination in such a way that I could bring it bustling to life in my novel?

Mexico City is so many things, but most of all it is an intriguing city of contradictions moved along by the amazing personalities that the Mexican people truly are. Just like their city, they can revel in a festival or stare down the barrel of despair with a smile, and it was my good fortune to work in Mexico City for years enough to find the people and the place irresistible. It is a huge, modern, iconic city of some twenty-two million with a contagious pulse and eclecticism that begs description.

I have strolled the finest of her streets, walked some of the worst and battled choking traffic. I have taken in the architectural delights of 900 years of history, enjoyed the artistic and cultural achievements on view even where one least expects, and the constant of music everywhere. Daily meals at sidewalk cafes, the art of conversation, business meetings surrounded by the influential at a chic restaurant or tradition steeped hacienda, or the magic of a street vendor taco have all contributed to and influenced my perception.

So, of course I had to at least try to understand it and with some good fortune, describe it. Get to know Mexico well and it becomes obvious the current incarnation of this place is connected through an almost suspended animation of the 1940s. That decade was in so many ways Mexico’s “Golden Years’ and the cultural, artistic, and sentimental attachment that lingers is much more, much different than a nostalgic one. The 1940s through its dance, its music, its film, its promise, is very much alive today.

It is the decade that defined a nation.

That is the feeling and the perception I knew I wanted to get across and it wasn’t very difficult to dive into the research of actual events leading to a storyline that would accomplish my goal. True to the ever-present contradictions of life here, the tale absolutely had to involve the darkly sinister undercurrent tugging and gnawing away at a peaceful existence. The overwhelming majority of locals and characters introduced in my story are true and the few that aren’t are an amalgamation of actual identities living in the novel under assumed names. My protagonist Arturo and his two girlfriends, Mercedes and Ana are the main ones and yes they are modeled after actual personalities, but they developed their persona as they dealt with situations history presented and they grew on me as the story progressed. I think their lives were mostly admirable and I became attached to them as they sorted out their future.

But I am probably rambling on here in a non-conformist style for the rapid-fire statement of an electronic blog post. Guess it happens when one loves the subject matter.

There, I said it. That is the essence of a living novel right there. I was inspired to resurrect this particular age of Mexico City’s history because of a love affair with the topic.

And that is why I enjoyed writing City of Promises so much.

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Author Connections: Site | Twitter | Facebook
Converse on Twitter: #CityOfPromisesTour

Fun Stuff for Your Blog via pureimaginationblog.com

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As Mr. Fitter was describing his memories of being in Mexico City, so too, did my own flit to life in front of my eyes of memory! The congested city streets where pedestrians never had the right away, and where there were more 1960s Beetles on the streets than I dare thought possible to have room to breathe! The pulse the author is speaking about was everywhere you walked and explored: as even though I was a teenager participating in an educational tour of Mexico, soaking up as much history as I attempted to soak up the everyday culture, being in Mexico is a life-changing experience. You see things through a different pair of eyes whilst your down there, as the dichotomy of those with and without is living out in stark contrast inasmuch as the raw beauty of their culture befit for admiration. You can walk a lifetime simply by moving from street to street, and stumbling across one neighbourhood after another or rather even, an excavation of the streets can reveal hidden mysteries of the past which had not yet been told. I loved the Square as well, a bit smaller than Red Square in Moscow, but with the presence that leaves you breathless. For all the splendors and beauty, even I could feel a sense of history yet told whilst I allowed my eyes to observe what was not yet readily known to mind. The street vendors were my best allies as well as little shoppes on corners as that is how I staid hydrated in the sweltering heat which was a switch of severity from my home state on the opposite side of the Gulf of Mexico! I always felt I *knew!* heat, but Mexico proved that I only had a hinting of what true heat can be! Oh, how I could have read more on behalf of Mr. Fitter’s reasons for digging into the past and finding himself engaged in the history of a country I shall always fondly remember as I had my own adventure there which shall never be anything but a joyous expedition of youth! Like Mr. Fitter, as he will soon realise if he visits my blog both after this goes live and on Friday when I post my book review, I am not the modern-age book blogger who writes with an absence of length, but rather a book blogger who harnesses the true joy of her designation as a blogger by allowing the breadth of a topic or subject a fitting well of unfiltered and unmonitored freedom of words! I never limit a Guest Post by an author anymore than I limit myself. There are times when words can falter to express how we feel, but in most cases, I find that I am a bubbly book blogger eagerly awaiting conversations to alight in her comment threads! May this keep you dear hearts until Friday, as I start my journey soon into “City of Promises”!

Fun Stuff for Your Blog via pureimaginationblog.com

Blog Book Tour Stop, courtesy of Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours

City of Promises Virtual Tour via Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours

Return on Friday when I review “City of Promises”!

Check out my upcoming bookish events to see what I will be hosting next for

Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours - HFVBTand mark your calendars!

Similar to blog tours, when I feature a showcase for an author via a Guest Post, Q&A, Interview, etc., I do not receive compensation for featuring supplemental content on my blog.

{SOURCES: City of Promises Book Cover, synopsis, tour badge, author photograph and HFVBT badge were provided by Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours and were used by permission. Blog Tour badge provided by Parajunkee to give book bloggers definition on their blogs. Post dividers by Fun Stuff for Your Blog via Pure Imagination.}

Copyright © Jorie Loves A Story, 2014.

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Posted Wednesday, 7 May, 2014 by jorielov in 20th Century, Blog Tour Host, Debut Author, Debut Novel, Equality In Literature, Geographically Specific, Historical Fiction, Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours, Mexico City, Reader Submitted Guest Post (Topic) for Author, Self-Published Author, the Forties

Jorie’s Box of Joy No.2 : Endeavouring to expand my literary wings with stories of enchanting themes!

Posted Monday, 28 April, 2014 by jorielov , , , , , , , , , , , 4 Comments

Jorie's Box of Joy | A Feature of Jorie Loves A Story

One of the happiest moments for a book blogger is eagerly going to their postbox & seeing what delightfully wicked print books have arrived for their reading pleasure! I have always held a keen interest in postal mail, being a long-term postal letter correspondent which has given me such a heart of joy seeing envelopes & bundles of love arrive from dear friends around the world. Imagine my new excitement in seeing the books I am reviewing arriving by publisher, author, publicist, or literary agent! Such an exciting new chapter in postal splendor!

I have been wanting to blog about my excitement about being placed on certain blog tours and/or in receiving books for review direct from authors, publishers, or publicists. I originally came across a weekly meme on Mondays entitled Mailbox Monday and you could say, that my new feature on Jorie Loves A Story is an extended idea from the original! Except to say, with one minor switch-up! Although I attempt to write down when books arrive by Post, I am never quite as certain when the books arrive as I am always reading the next book in hand! Therefore, please join me as I get excited about the books on my shelf which are next in line to read!

Fun Stuff for Your Blog via pureimaginationblog.comSeeing Green by Annabel HertzI am always attempting to keep myself open to reading books which push me outside the comforts of what I regularly read in order to keep my reading life an evolving journey towards exploring every facet of literature that I can as I shift from one author to another. When I first saw this particular book being offered on tour with JKS Communications, part of me was excited in seeing a book step forward that was not the traditional story to empathsis our need to be more environmentally conscience in our livelihoods as much as in how we approach living day to day. This book I felt would not only challenge me as a reader but it would challenge a few precepts of where I thought we had broached to head next on an environmental level and where we still have a heap of work to undergo towards reaching a pinnacle of progress as a society with a green-mindset in place to help future generations make better choices than the ones who came before them. I find the topic of environmental conservation and preservation as stimulating as discussing green-minded practices in business, commerce, and trade. To uncover green sources of energy, materials, and supplies which take the burden off the Earth and allow us to live a healthier life overall is quite enticing.

My review will post Thursday, 1st May.

Flight to Coorah Creek by Janet Gover

Happily in the wake of my first #ChocLitSaturdays Chat on Twitter {Backstory of the Chat & Info prior to Launch} I am going to be reading a new-to-me ChocLitUK author: Janet Gover! Her book stood out to me for several reasons, but one is my love & appreciation for small townes combined with the Australian Outback! I wanted to take a step outside my natural tendency to read historical fiction and enter into the realm of a Contemporary Romance set in a remote location where true to a small towne flair of sensibility everyone knows the affairs of your life and truly looks out for you at the same time. I wanted to try out stories from ChocLit which could introduce me to not only more new authors but new styles of writing as well. I do not often read Contemporary Romances, although I simply adore Sherryl Wood’s Serenity series (wait, I think that is my endearing name for it! oh, yes, “The Sweet Magnolias”!) as much as books by Debbie Macomber! I have settled inside the Victorian & Regency eras so readily the past several years, that I have forgotten that I do indeed appreciate a lovely story set in the modern world with contemporary characters! I also felt this one might have a heap of intriguing scenery to boot, as the name simply implied to me a part of the country that would be an interesting place to set the story!

My review will post 3rd May, 16th of August 2014 ahead of #ChocLitSaturdays Chat which begins at 11am EST | 8am PST | 4pm UK | 1am Australia! I am thankful that my #ChocLitSaturdays blog feature not only encompasses book reviews, Guest Posts, & Author Interviews but the ability for Romance readers to converse about romantic themes inside the novels we gravitate towards as much as a healthy appreciation of tea and chocolate! I previously mentioned this title in Jorie’s Box of Joy No.1.

Cats Are Part of HIs Kingdom Too by Cindy Vincent

My second tour to host for Ms. Amber Stokes (Editing Through the Seasons) will be for a lovely devotional which is quite devoted to an animal close to my heart: the cat! I have oft felt blessed to have the cats in my life that I have over the years, as each one would bring a certain level of serenity and calm into my life. As much as give me the gifted blessing of learning things such as cheeky humour in the midst of chaos that are simply too incredible not to acknowledge! Cats are truly my favourite companions next to dogs and hamsters, as they know how to impart unconditional love and pure grace in spirit.

When we expanded to have more than one cat, I started to have the honour of seeing how the inter-dynamics of a family can change simply by not having one cat but a handful. Different litters always have the presumption of not behaving well with each other, but I can attest that even a motley cat family from different litters can not only learn to adapt but they adjust to a comfortable level of ease around each other. I am always amazed and blessed to observe my cats, as they give so much love back to me as I give to them. I cannot wait to dig into this devotional to see where the lessons of living with cats endeared Ms. Vincent to write a devotional about how the lessons of life can alight in our lives at the most unexpected moments on the wings and shoulders of messengers we might not have realised to believe could give us so much truth.

My review will post Sunday, 4th May.

The Boleyn Bride by Brandy Purdy

Whilst following the blog tour for The Boleyn Bride my path crossed with the author Ms. Purdy, which led to an opportunity for me to receive this book to review. What was so incredible about the timing of it, is that it was one book that I felt I could draw myself inside and visit with the characters for quite a spell afterwards! Some stories you read about give you this itch to read the book as soon as your able too, and for me, this is one of those books! The clever bit is that I do not recall knowing too much about the Boleyn’s much less the Tudor era of England, as I have predominately always alighted between the text of Shakespeare straight into the Victorian, Regency, or Edwardian (of late) eras of visitation! The Tudors for some reason escaped my radar until recently. My interest started to pique when I found a bookish blog devoted to the Tudors and the literature which flows out of the pens of historical fiction writers: The Tudor Book Blog. I am hopeful that this will mark my start of selecting Tudor era novels and writers to help me not only learn more about this section of British History, but to help me settle into an era that I know so very little about and am thirsty to learn more!

My review will post Sunday, 14th May.

City of Promises by D. Grant Fitter

When City of Promises came available to tour with Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours, I must confess, I was teetering on the edge of saying ‘yes’ to accept this book for review. My only hesitation was due to the fact that I have been to Mexico City and therefore, was uncertain if I could return to a fictional account of the city and maintain my memories of her in the ensuing decades since this particular sliver of the city’s history takes place. In the end, I decided that if I can handle reading about the Jazz Age in America as much as Prohibition and the upturnt tides of Chicago & New York City’s histories, can I can surely handle reading what happened in Mexico City! After all, when I was there the city was undergoing a bit of a Renaissance, in an attempt to re-strengthen the city’s identity as much as to re-define the city itself. It was the heart of the story given inside the premise that pulled at me, and for which I am most anxious to see where the corridors of this particular historical fiction will take me! I am always eager to traverse into the passageways of history that might not always lend a happy ending but will lend itself a portal glimpse into a part of history that needs to be told.

My Review will post on Tuesday, 9th of May.

Getting Waisted by Monica ParkerWhilst attending the #LitChat of comedienne Monica Parker, I had the unexpected joy and pleasure of being able to receive her debut book Getting Waisted after an exchange of conversation between Ms. Parker, her literary publicist Ms. Chan, and myself! I had reached out to Ms. Parker after the literary chat and felt quite honoured I was given this opportunity as health & wellness holds fast to my heart! As I have been on a path towards wellness for years, seeking out the best way to maintain wellness and knowing which foods agree with my system over others. Personally, I am the most happiest in my spirit whilst eating a vegetarian and vegan diet enriched by whole foods, natural & ancient grains, as well as local farm fresh vegetables and fruits.

I can relate directly to finding inner harmony, balance, and confidence to be who you are and accept yourself at where you are on your lifepath because everyone can struggle with self-image and self-confidence no matter what age they are or where they are on their journey! I was ever so thrilled to bits seeing her book had arrived by Post, as I cannot wait to settle inside the pages as I know not only will I have the pleasure of reviewing this book but in hosting an interview with Ms. Parker at the conclusion of my reading! I had even further excited by having found a video interview of Ms. Parker’s which I will share with you now as a preview of what is yet to come:

Shannon Skinner Interviews Monica Parker on Extraordinary Women

via Extraordinary Women TV

My forthcoming review of Getting Waisted and my Author Interview with Ms. Parker will occur during the #ArmChairBEA week in which I am participating as a #bookcheerleader (the tag I created to help celebrate the fact I love cheering for books & authors!)! I am getting underway to begin reading the memoir now as I will have a lot to talk about with Ms. Parker once I reach the last page! She has already inspired me to create the sinful chocolate cake in a mug which was a curious surprise in the opening bits of the memoir!

Fun Stuff for Your Blog via pureimaginationblog.comI am curious then, if any of the newly arrived books for review which are upcoming on Jorie Loves A Story, would entice a visiting reader to pick them up for themselves!? OR, if they perchance had the opportunity already to read them, what were their impressions?! What drew you to the author or the narrative within!? And, if you are a fellow book blogger how do you feel your literary wanderings have increased since you started blogging about your reading life? Do you find the twitterverse an exciting portal towards extending friendship and conversation? And, what do you feel is the best gift you’ve received since you started your book blog!?

Cross-posted with Mailbox Monday (a weekly meme) on Monday, 28th of April where book bloggers & readers alike share their inbound books for review, newly purchased books, or otherwise added to their shelves to read. Conversing via: #MailboxMonday My feature was inspired by Mailbox Monday, however as I am always in throes of reading books for review and/or borrowing books from my library, I am never quite as certain which week the books have arrived!

{SOURCES: Jorie Loves A Story badge created by Ravven with edits in Fotoflexer by Jorie. Book cover for “Seeing Green” was provided by JKS Communications for both review and promotion; used with permission.  The Book Cover for “Flight to Coorah Creek” was provided by ChocLitUK for both review and promotion; used with permission. Book Cover for Cats Are Part of His Kingdom Too provided by Editing Through the Seasons for both review and promotion; used with permission. Book Cover for The Boleyn Bride provided by Brandy Purdy for both review and promotion; used with permission. Book Cover for City of Promises provided by Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours for both review and promotion; used with permission. Book cover for “Getting Waisted” provided by Darlene Chan (Publicist) for both review and promotion; used with permission. The interview for Monica Parker by Extraordinary Women TV had either URL share links or coding which made it possible to embed this media portal to this post, and I thank them for the opportunity to share more about this novel and the author who penned it.}

Copyright © Jorie Loves A Story, 2014.

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Posted Monday, 28 April, 2014 by jorielov in Author Interview, Biographical Fiction & Non-Fiction, Blog Tour Host, Bookish Discussions, Books for Review Arrived by Post, ChocLitSaturdays, ChocLitUK, Debut Novel, Editing Through The Seasons, Elizabeth Howard Boleyn, Environmental Conscience, Environmental Science, Historical Fiction, Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours, Indie Author, Jorie's Box of Joy, Memoir, Non-Fiction, Romance Fiction, Small Towne Fiction, Tudor Era