Genre: Science

+Book Review+ Sandra Leesmith’s “Love’s Promises” #sweetromance, #Romance

Posted Monday, 28 July, 2014 by jorielov , , , 2 Comments

Parajunkee Designs

Loves Promises by Sandra Leesmith
Artwork Credit: Lena Goldfinch

 Love’s Promises by Sandra Leesmith

Published By: Amber Press Publishing, March 2014
Official Author Websites: Site | Twitter | Facebook
  Cover Designer Pages: Site | Twitter | Facebook | Pin(terest) Boards
Available Formats: Paperback, Ebook
Page Count: 310

[Previous Releases]

  • “Loves Refuge”+
  • “Loves Miracles”+
  • {note} +part of the same series as Love’s Promises!

Converse via Twitter: #LovesPromises, #ChrisFic,

#cleanromance, & #inspirationalfiction

Genres: Fiction | Inspirational Fiction

Romance | Contemporary

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Acquired Book By: I had originally intended to read “Love’s Promises” for review on the blog tour earlier in the Spring, however, at that point in time the novel was only going to be released in Ebook format rather than print edition. Through my participation on the tour, I received the good news that a print edition was viable and would be put into action. I received a complimentary copy of the book direct from the author Sandra Leesmith, in exchange for an honest review. I did not receive compensation for my opinions or thoughts shared herein.

Inspired to Read:

I am always keen on reading the books I highlight and spotlight on Jorie Loves A Story, and this novel in particular caught my attention when I was first offered to participate on the original blog tour hosted by Amber Stokes and her Editing Through the Seasons publicity company. I appreciate being what I consider a ‘hybrid reader’ as one who reads both mainstream and inspirational markets for fiction and non-fiction. I talk about this a bit under “My Bookish Life” and hinted about it on the note that proceeded this book review when I explained why posting this took a bit longer than originally expected due health and life reasons occurring at a pace that simply exhausted me. I always aim to feature novels through Guest Author & Book Features that will key into the diverse variety of books I appreciate reading overall.

I was originally going to only focus on books in print, but then I re-considered when I noted that many ebooks I would dearly love to read eventually end up in print editions. This can take anywhere from a few months to a full year or longer depending on the publisher, author, and body of work. I decided to stand firm in being a traditional reader but to yield as a book blogger to highlight books first released into an electronic version that I would one day hope would go into a print run as well. In this way, I am opening my mind to a wider net of authors and stories but remaining true to who I am as a reader and as a blogger at the same time. I am thankful that my path crossed with Ms. Leesmith and with Ms. Stokes, as I might not have stumbled across this particular novel nor the lovely series it is a part of.

My original showcases on Leesmith’s behalf was a heap of joy for me, as it encouraged me to re-examine where the publishing world is currently with a green-minded focus on publishing and printing practices (a bit of an on-going personal research topic of interest) as much as it gave a strong impression on having an open discussion on where writers and readers alike stand on the position of being green-minded and being voracious readers. For me, it confirmed that you can be environmentally conscience and read print books without having to concede to ebooks and ereaders. Notwithstanding of the fact that not all of us can use ereaders nor read ebooks in any format due to our vision and the way in which we process information.

My participation led to a healthy itch to read “Love’s Promises” and I felt blessed that I had the opportunity to tuck inside the story of how a novel went into print format when it was originally only scheduled for one type of release. The further blessing was discovering the other two books in the Love Promises series are already released in print, and are on my ‘next reads’ list of books to acquire!

Book Synopsis:

For Monica Scott, building her late father’s house at Lake Tahoe isn’t an option—it’s a necessary distraction from confusing memories and an uncertain future. But a handsome planner working for the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (TRPA) is keeping Monica from moving forward with the project. Never mind that he’s young and charming with a great sense of humor. No one is going to stop Monica from making her father’s dream—and her own—a reality.

All Greg Linsey wants is for his work to mean something. His job at TRPA gives him the opportunity to fight for the environment he loves and make a difference in his small corner of the world. But with the sophisticated Monica Scott’s arrival, his dedication is tested as never before, especially when Monica turns to his unscrupulous nemesis for assistance. As Greg and Monica’s animosity turns into something far sweeter, can they learn to accept each other’s promises and avoid the growing danger to their lives and hearts?

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Sandra LeesmithAuthor Biography:  SANDRA LEESMITH loves to travel in her RV and explore all of nature’s beauty, discover America’s history, and fellowship with the wonderful people she meets while on the road. She enjoys reading, writing, hiking, swimming, and pickleball. Learn more about Sandra and her books at sandraleesmith.com.

Book Cover Designer Biography: LENA GOLDFINCH writes fantasy and Lena Goldfinchromance for teens and adults. She’s a sucker for a good old-fashioned romance, whether it’s a novel, novella, or short story, young adult or adult, fantasy or realistic, contemporary or historical. Elements of romance, fantasy, and mystery have a way of creeping into her writing, even when she’s writing something light and contemporary like her latest releases, Haunting Joy and Take a Picture. Lena has been a finalist in several national writing contests, including the RWA Golden Heart and ACFW Genesis contests. She lives in a scenic small town in Massachusetts with her husband, two kids, and a very spoiled Black Lab. Learn more about Lena and her books at lenagoldfinch.blogspot.com.

 

Romance, Thirty-somethings, & the Environment:

I shall never discredit the timing of a book in hand nor of the story at the heart of the novel’s message to be consumed at a particular moment in time as this particular one has reached my eyes and mind! I cannot deny that I am a thirty-something myself nor a singleton who oft thinks about her own life, her chosen path, and where the pebbles of her path shall lead her next. Each of us is living a life of worth and it is not always measured in events and incidents that the masses experience but in smaller steps and graces which take us to where we are being led to traverse. I love stories of the heart as much as the human condition, to knit inside the small fragments of time wherein we cross-examine our own hearts, spirits, and desires of will — to understand where we have been as much as where we are going next. I had to nearly chuckle to myself whilst realising a bit of the cheeky humour Leesmith placed inside her two lead characters, as both Monica and Greg are within a farthing of a distance in age from each other, and experiencing the same self-exploration and questions of the heart that neither wants to admit possible.

I think thirty-somethings have a lot of ground to cover in today’s fiction, especially in the Romance side of the ledger. To oft writers focus on someone either in college or thereafter or even settle inside the years of the twenties, but few root out the early years of being twentyten and thirty-something; the decisive age for most singletons either in want of finding someone to walk through life with or to walk alone. It is a unique perspective to give in fiction, as the veins of narrative can go in so many unique and different directions. Whilst in the opening bits of Love’s Promises, what I especially liked is how the path Leesmith chooses to take is not quite predictable nor is it contrite. She breathes a bit of life into the characters and gives them enough realism and free will to keep you in suspense of what their choices will be the further you walk inside their story.

The environment is nearly a third character in the story, as the natural environment is beautifully highlighted as the backdrop and setting for Love’s Promises. I appreciated the care and attention the advocacy and conservation on the Lake Tahoe Basin were given throughout the story, as it illuminates one small fraction of how over building and overusing our natural resources is becoming a larger problem as a whole. There are too many loosely controlled environmental protections on building permits and on maintaining natural habitats. I’ve even witnessed where previously protected land was sold to the highest bidder and commericalised for consumer use; at the determent of the wildlife and ecosystem. There needs to be a better balance between sustaining the ecological habitats already thriving where developers and residents want to intercede on their right to build. I celebrate the small successes such as non-chemical pest control by water sources, walkways and green paths in urban developments that do not deter from the natural ecosystems, and a recognition of local bird and wildlife habitats being protected by watchful observations by local groups working for preservation and conservation of their lands. I commend the research Leesmith knitted into her novel, as she is tackling a very difficult issue and a controversial topic laced with politics on all levels.

Read More

Reading this book contributed to these challenges:

  • Go Indie
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Posted Monday, 28 July, 2014 by jorielov in 20th Century, Agnostic (Questioning & Searching or Unsure), Balance of Faith whilst Living, Blogs I Regularly Read, Book Review (non-blog tour), Bookish Discussions, Conservation, Contemporary Romance, Death, Sorrow, and Loss, Domestic Violence, Eco-Friendly, Ecology, Editing Through The Seasons, Environmental Activism, Environmental Advocacy, Environmental Conscience, Environmental Solutions, Fathers and Daughters, Indie Author, Indie Book Trade, Inspirational Fiction & Non-Fiction, Lake Tahoe, Life of Thirty-Somethings, Life Shift, Modern Day, Mother-Daughter Relationships, Nature & Wildlife, Pacific Crest Trail, Political Narrative & Modern Topics, Preservation, Romance Fiction, Seekerville, Singletons & Commitment, Sustainability & Ecological Preservation, Walking & Hiking Trails, Women's Fiction

+Blog Book Tour+ Harvesting Space for a Greener Earth by Greg Matloff, C Bangs, & Les Johnson #nonfiction #science

Posted Monday, 7 July, 2014 by jorielov , , , , , 5 Comments

Parajunkee DesignsHarvesting Space for a Greener Earth by Greg Matloff, C. Bangs, & Les Johnson

Published By: Springer Science-Business Media (),
(second edition) August, 2014
Official Author WebsitesMatloff: Site | YouTube Bangs: Site Johnson: Site
Available Formats: Softcover & Ebook Page Count: 277 & 120 illustrations

Converse on Twitter: #HarvestingSpace & #Springer

Facebook Page dedicated to getting “Harvesting Space” into the public eye

Fields & Topics of Study:

Alternative Energy, Space Science, Sustainability from Space & Climate Change

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Acquired Book By: I was selected to be a tour stop on the “Harvesting Space for a Greener Earth” virtual book tour through TLC Book Tours. I received a complimentary copy of the book direct from one of the authors C Bangs, in exchange for an honest review. I did not receive compensation for my opinions or thoughts shared herein.

Keen Interest in Premise:

Ever since I was a fifth grader whose path crossed with an Environmentalist (part of the bring your Dad to work programme) who was the father of a classmate, I have firmly always had a keen eye on the environment. Seeing “Medicine Man” that same year left an impression on my young mind and heart as well, as nothing else could have had a greater impact than seeing the necessity of natural resources and the preservation of those resources for the greater good of mankind. I always felt a connection to the outside world, and as I grew I kept a pulse on where the ecological heart of the Earth was heading as much as what nature and the environs therein were attempting to tell us; warn us. We are very much the caregivers and caretakers of Earth – a belief of the Native Americans, of whom I was honoured to hear some of their stories and legacies of knowledge as I grew up with a Native American Art Gallery and bookstore; the owner of whom took a kindness of teaching me the stories he was given himself as a boy. I believe as they do, that it is our mission to not only protect each other from harm, but to protect the home by which we inherited. For these reasons and more, the very essence of this non-fiction release held my attention at ‘hallo’.

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Book Synopsis:

What was our planet like in years past? How has our civilization affected Earth and its ecology? Harvesting Space for a Greener Earth, the Second Edition of Paradise Regained: The Regreening of the Earth, begins by discussing these questions, and then generates a scenario for the restoration of Earth. It introduces new and innovative ideas on how we could use Solar System and its resources for terrestrial benefit.

The environmental challenges that face us today cannot be resolved by conservation and current technologies alone. Harvesting Space highlights the risk of humankind’s future extinction from environmental degradation. Population growth, global climate change, and maintaining sustainability of habitats for wildlife are all considered, among other issues.

Rather than losing heart, we need to realize that the solutions to these problems lie in being good stewards of the planet and in the development of space. Not only will the solutions offered here avert a crisis, they will also provide the basis for continued technological and societal progress. Tapping the resources of near-Earth asteroids will lead to methods of diverting those asteroids that threaten Earth. Space-based terrestrial power generation systems will work synergistically with Earth-based conservation.

This book needs to be read urgently and widely, if we are to save ourselves from environmental disaster, reduce the risk of catastrophic cosmic impacts, and build a prosperous and sustainable future for all the creatures of Earth.

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Author Biographies:

Dr. Greg Matloff, is a leading expert in possibilities for interstellar propulsion , especially near-Sun solar-sail trajectories that might ultimately enable interstellar travel. and is an emeritus and adjunct associate astronomy professor with the physics department of New York City College of Technology, CUNY, a consultant with NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, a Hayden Associate of the American Museum of Natural History and a Corresponding Member of the International Academy of Astronautics. He co-authored with Les Johnson of NASA and C Bangs Paradise Regained (2009), Living Off the Land in Space (2007) and has authored Deep-Space Probes (edition 1: 2000 and edition 2: 2005). As well as authoring More Telescope Power (2002), Telescope Power (1993), The Urban Astronomer (1991), he co-authored with Eugene Mallove The Starflight Handbook. (1989). His papers on interstellar travel, the search for extraterrestrial artifacts, and methods of protecting Earth from asteroid impacts have been published in JBIS, Acta Astronautica, Spaceflight, Space Technology, Journal of Astronautical Sciences, and Mercury. His popular articles have appeared in many publications, including Analog. In 1998, he won a $5000 prize in the international essay contest on ETI sponsored by the National Institute for Discovery Science. . He served on a November 2007 panel organized by Seed magazine to brief Congressional staff on the possibilities of a sustainable, meaningful space program. In 2011, he co-authored with C Bangs an artist’s book entitled Biosphere Extension: Solar System Resources for the Earth.

Professor Matloff is a Fellow of the British Interplanetary Society and a Member of the International Academy of Astronautics. He has chaired many technical sessions and is listed in numerous volumes of Who’s Who. In 2008, he was honored as Scholar on Campus at New York City College of Technology. His most recent astronautics book, co-authored with Italian researcher Dr. Giovanni Vulpetti and Les Johnson, is Solar Sails: A Novel Approach to Interplanetary Travel, Springer (2008). In addition to his interstellar-travel research, he has contributed to SETI (the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence), modeling studies of human effects on Earth’s atmosphere, interplanetary exploration concept analysis, alternative energy, in-space navigation, and the search for extrasolar planets.

C Bangs’ art investigates frontier science combined with symbolist figuration from an ecological feminist point of view. Her work is included in public and private collections as well as in books and journals. Public Collections include the Library of Congress, NASA’s Marshall Spaceflight Center, The British Interplanetary Society, New York City College of Technology, Pratt Institute, Cornell University and Pace University. I Am the Cosmos exhibition at the New Jersey State Museum in Trenton included her work, Raw Materials from Space and the Orbital Steam Locomotive. Her art has been included in eight books and two peer- reviewed journal articles, several magazine articles and art catalogs. Merging art and science, she worked for three summers as a NASA Faculty Fellow, and under a NASA grant she investigated holographic interstellar probe message plaques. Her recent artist’s book collaboration with Greg Matloff, Biosphere Extension: Solar System Resources for the Earth, was recently collected by the Brooklyn Museum for their artist-book collection.

“The artist C Bangs and astronomer Greg Matloff are long time partners and collaborators whose mutual interests and complementary talents serve them well. For many years, Bangs has been the artist who provides the graphic interpretation of their scientific books, they have achieved another level; their work has never been so well integrated, as they have found a method where text and image become one, rather than one illustrating the other. The more esoteric points of Matloff’s research find an accessibility, while Bangs more than ever seamlessly offers us, through imagery, a lyrical telling of their story for the quest to access solar system resources for the Earth.” – Maddy Rosenberg, Central Booking Gallery, NYC

Les Johnson is a physicist, and the author of several popular science books about space exploration, Living Off the Land in Space, Solar Sailing: A Novel Approach to Interplanetary Travel, Paradise Regained: The Regreening of Earth, Sky Alert: When Satellites Fail, and Harvesting Space for a Greener Earth, as well as three science fiction books, Back to the Moon, Going Interstellar, and Rescue Mode.

He is also the Senior Technical Advisor for NASA’s Advanced Concepts Office at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Les is the NASA Co-Investigator (Co-I) for the European Union’s Deploytech Solar Sail demonstration mission planned for launch in 2015. He was the NASA Co-I for the JAXA T-Rex Space Tether Experiment and PI of NASA’s ProSEDS Experiment. During his career at NASA, he served as the Manager for the Space Science Programs and Projects Office, the In-Space Propulsion Technology Program, and the Interstellar Propulsion Research Project. He thrice received NASA’s Exceptional Achievement Medal and has 3 patents.

Les is a frequent contributor to the Journal of the British Interplanetary Society and a member of the National Space Society, the World Future Society, and MENSA. He serves on the Editorial Advisory Board for the British Interplanetary Society and is Chairman of the Tennessee Valley Interstellar Workshop. Les was the featured “interstellar explorer” in the January 2013 issue of National Geographic magazine and a technical consultant for the movie Europa Report.

Les earned his Master’s degree in physics from Vanderbilt University in 1986 and his Bachelor’s degree from Transylvania University in 1984.

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Foreward by Jack McDevitt: Site | on behalf of the first edition (2010)

I appreciated the cadence of McDevitt’s approach to introducing the work at hand to the everyday reader, starting off by presenting all the ill begotten newsbits that we’re all too familiar with having heard at one point or another startling our nerves as we tune into radio or televised news. The truth in the pudding is the fact that we tend to hear more negative news than positive, and less so even on the technologic changes to our economy and environmental ecosystem that is in most need of attention. I found his cheeky humour well placed and his ability to surmise the necessity of the work contained in Harvesting Space for a Greener Earth well executed.

McDevitt is actually an author in science fiction I have acknowledged in name only, and have not yet taken the chance to explore his collective works. Science fiction and fantasy combined is a branch of literature that once you start to consume the canons of the grandmothers and grandmothers, or even prior to that even, you will soon come across the writers, like McDevitt who draw your eye into their stories. I admit, I have not always had the time to give to exploring the worlds that I discover, but I am always one who celebrates the ready amount of choice being offered for the science fiction and fantasy reader. Most of us generally speaking are into reading hard-core science as much as we are the fiction counterparts. For it is a semi well-known fact, that bits and bobbles of our science and technologic shifts in discoveries have sometimes been purported out of the fictional tales of the writers who give our minds something to chew on outside our realm of possibility. Imagination truly has always been the key to unlocking what is not yet known or understood to be plausible.

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Fun Stuff for Your Blog via pureimaginationblog.comI always set out to approach how I review non-fiction titles and anthologies in a different manner than I would a novel, because in all honesty, they have their own rhythm to how their stories unfold. Non-fiction titles are generally broken into different sections (especially if the subject is of a Science related field) which is vindictive of anthologies, whose collective stories make up the whole of the book. Therefore, you will find this book review set to a different tone and pace than my regular faire.

I have known about the plan to extract part of what we create on Earth and to jettison that bit of production out to space as much as I have been aware of the theory that Space can handle more excess than what we can keep here on Earth. However, I do have a keen issue with this part of the theory, of being able to use Space without fear of consequence as Space appears to be a place where no harm can come to it. I oft wondered about all the left behind space debris and the accumulated bits we’ve already left to the pure nothingness that is Space. I am not sure why it is the one place we always approach outside our mindset of ‘leave no trace’ because it appears that if we were to conquer the ability to shift our industrial productivity to the Cosmos, would we then not want to ensure that whatever we ‘bring to Space’ is brought with the belief that we would be leaving less of an impression on the cosmos than we had on Earth!? OR are we simply going to continue to repeat a pattern of doing what works well for us in the short-term and not think of any long-term effects at all!? I would imagine, despite how seemingly different Space is to Earth, even in that realm there are perimeters of order outside the chaos.

I am not sure if I can go with a clear conscience to say that I fully support shifting our industries to Space if we do not have a clearly defined code of ethics and safety in place to ensure that whatever we ‘add’ to Space is not going to ‘subtract’ from what is already naturally occurring and viable. If we have not yet mastered the ability to be stewards of Earth, how then, can we become stewards of Space? We cannot take a direct step backwards and wreck havoc in a new environment simply because it ‘makes sense’ to re-distribute our problems to a place that has a higher yield of improbable elements of consequence.

To fully substantiate the proposition in Harvesting Space for a Greener Earth, the authors lay down the foundation of how Earth and Space originated in their uniqueness and how the history of their origins helps them better understand the future of both on equal grounds. This is the building block beginning to the book, as they shift and alternative between designated sections to help present the case, the argument, and the resolution for our dire need in living greener and in a way that is more efficient for our rate of consumption and expansion of living practices.

I was thankful to see a mentioning of the garbage and plastic waste ‘lingering in the Pacific Ocean’ as that is one credible example of how I would not appreciate seeing our efforts to fix our problems lead to a further issue out in Space. We tend to want quick answers to complicated problems, but the best answer will always be the one that does not yield to more problems but rather a better livable example of how to live well, produce energy without consequences we cannot ethical live with, and become better protectors of what we inherit to preserve.

I recognise that Space is a frontier we have not yet tapped, but why would we want to risk its own health for our own gain? I am uncertain I fully understood nor accept, that simply because we can harvest resources out of Space that we should take that course of action. We seem to eradicate the cause and effect from this dialogue for change. Not all change is positive and there are always limitations of what we do not yet understand. How can we honestly know the precise measure of what effect new technology and polluted waste will have on the stability of Space? Anytime you start to shift the status que there will be consequences, whether seen, unseen, or cast aside from view.

Harvesting Space for a Greener Earth provides a key view into the insight of where technology and progress is leading us forward towards healing the Earth of our mistakes of the past wherein we had limited Earth’s recovery from the processes of our own industrial age of expansion. Where I find myself on the fence of commitment lies within the heart of change discussed within the book itself. Perhaps it’s because I saw Medicine Man as a ten-year-old whose heart was already tethered to her connection to the natural world, or perhaps it’s because I always believed in the Hippocratic Oath. Either way, for me personally, I can attest the direction we choose to head into the future as a resolution towards our present circumstances, I can only hope that we weigh and consider our next effect on an environment that was fully functional and self-reliant before we ever altered its natural and evolving state of existence.

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Jorie, the girl with a scientific heart

One of the branches of literature I love exploring the most is non-fiction scientific research topics, subjects, and explorations where modern cutting-edge discoveries are impacting our lives whether we know about them or not. I have been wanting to dip back into my science-focused past, picking up where I left off reading and continue to venture into the areas of research and scientific discovery that enlightens my own mind to gain knowledge of. I have had the long-term goals to bring the books that I find which illuminate a particular topic to a level of degree of clarity and depth of knowledge in that working field to my regular readers and visitors of Jorie Loves A Story, as even within the non-fiction realms, I have oft found a ‘story’ behind the element of surprise discovery! Science might be grounded in fact and in the logistical side of proof (unless your examining the theoretical side of physics, which is my own personal preference!) but within the height of new and emerging paragrams of successful progress, we find a story is stitched together behind-the-scenes! And, that in of itself makes me giddy about researching science on a whole!

I have previously reviewed a handful of non-fiction titles on my blog, and it will continue to grow momentum as I find myself attracted to books on a case-by-case basis! Sometimes its the topic or subject contained within the book itself and sometimes it’s merely the approach of those who pen the research! I like keeping my mind open to the possibilities and remaining truthful to my own desire of gaining knowledge in the respective fields I draw an interest.

Science for me was always a big, big draw in my childhood as I practically lived at the Science Center in the city of my birth! The hours I spent over the Summers inside workshoppes, classes, and field trips are too numerous to even relay to you, but simply know that if it was an adventure within an out-of-the-box class for children and examined a curiosity I had under the general umbrella of  ‘science’, I was surely front row center! The best bit is that as I grew, I never outgrew my zest for science or for science theories and discoveries. One of my favourite subjects in high school was the quest behind the pursuit of understanding DNA, which involved Watson, Crick, and Rosalind Franklin. My twenties fused together my passion for the quantum realms, and as an undercurrent of interest oceanography, geophysics, cosmology, and astrophysics were always in close pursuit of each other. Having a careful eye for newsbits on an involving scale of interest from the fields of meteorology, solar optics, volcanology & plate tectonics, and environmental science (with includes every off-branch therein!) I have come to realise that my pursuit for understanding is now interconnected, threaded, and fused together!

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This Blog Tour Stop is courtesy of TLC Book Tours:

TLC Book Tours | Tour HostVirtual Road Map of “Harvesting Space for a Greener Earth” Blog Tour:

Monday, June 23rd: Ms. Nose in a Book

Tuesday, June 24th: A Curious Gal

Thursday, June 26th: 100 Pages a Day … Stephanie’s Book Reviews

Monday, June 30th: Green Tech Gazette

Wednesday, July 2nd: Kinx’s Book Nook

Thursday, July 3rd: guiltless reading

TBD: Grist

Monday: 7 July: Jorie Loves a Story

TBD: GreenMoxie

Please visit my Bookish Events page to stay in the know for upcoming events!

{SOURCES: Book cover for “Harvesting Space for a Greener Earth”, Author Biographies and Book Synopsis  were provided by TLC Book Tours and used with permission. Blog Tour badge & I Blog Books Non-Fiction badge provided by Parajunkee to give book bloggers definition on their blogs. Post dividers by Fun Stuff for Your Blog via Pure Imagination. }

Copyright © Jorie Loves A Story, 2014.

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Posted Monday, 7 July, 2014 by jorielov in 20th Century, 21st Century, Alternative Energy, Asteroid Science, Bits & Bobbles of Jorie, Blog Tour Host & Reviewer, Bookish Discussions, Climate Change, Environmental Activism, Environmental Advocacy, Environmental Science, Environmental Solutions, Extraterrestrial Physics, GeoPhysical History, Green-Minded Social Awareness, History, Indie Author, Mechanical Engineering, Modern Day, Non-Fiction, Political Narrative & Modern Topics, Popular Astronomy, Science, Science Fiction, Social Change, Space Science, Sustainability & Ecological Preservation, Sustainability from Space, TLC Book Tours

+Blog Book Tour+ Seeing Green by Annabel Hertz Whilst engaged in the dialogue of #ThinkGreen & #EnvironmentalAdvocacy

Posted Thursday, 1 May, 2014 by jorielov , , 0 Comments

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Seeing Green by Annabel Hertz

Seeing Green Virtual Book Tour with JKS Communications

Published By: Self-Published, 15 April, 2014
Official Author Websites: Twitter | Facebook
Available Formats: Softcover
Page Count: 223

Converse on Twitter: #AnnabelHertz

Top Green Tags: #ThinkGreen, #ecofriendly, #greenpublishing, #sustainability

As much as I loved using: #EarthDay2014 & #EarthDay !!

Will be using: #EarthDayEveryday

Others include: #environment, #GoGreen, #Upcycle, #Recycle, #GreenGrowth

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Acquired Book By: I was selected to be a tour stop on the “Seeing Green” virtual book tour through JKS Communications: A Literary Publicity Firm. I received a complimentary copy of the book direct from JKS Communications, in exchange for an honest review. I did not receive compensation for my opinions or thoughts shared herein.

Fun Stuff for Your Blog via pureimaginationblog.comInspiring Speech on behalf of the Earth Summit of 1992:

Severn Cullis-Suzuki at Rio Summit 1992 via We Canada

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Book Synopsis:Seeing Green by Annabel Hertz

Drawing on clever social commentary and her own experience in the political realm, author Annabel Hertz will get readers “Seeing Green” in no time.

Her new book “Seeing Green” (April 15, 2014) steps into the world of cutthroat politics and environmental policy as seen through the eyes of a young multicultural woman whose personal life seems to parallel her professional life as an activist on the front-lines of Washington D.C. in the ’90s. Never afraid to articulate her personal convictions, Hertz’s modern day heroine is strong and profound, yet humorous and relatable.

Author Biography:

Annabel Hertz“Seeing Green” is Hertz’s first endeavor in historical fiction, much like the protagonist she introduces in “Seeing Green,” Hertz has delved into the world of politics with organizations involved in international relations and sustainable development. More recently, she served as a policy consultant, adjunct professor at the Geneva School of Diplomacy and International Relations and Global Governance Fellow at the World Economic Forum.

“Seeing Green” is Hertz’s debut novel. She holds master’s degrees from Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and San Francisco State University, as well as a bachelor’s degree from the University of California where she studied politics. Hertz is currently pursuing a doctorate in international relations at American University in Washington D.C.

Fun Stuff for Your Blog via pureimaginationblog.comMy thoughts on Environmental Concerns:

I do have a conscience heart for the environment which is why Seeing Green appeals to me! Ever since 5th grade (1989-90) as on take your parent to school day one of my classmates Dad came in to talk about environmental science, preservation, and activism! Combined with seeing Medicine Man that same year, you could say I was a natural environmental advocate! My early experience in getting into the dialogue of environmental concerns and progressive thoughts towards action, responsibility, and response has endeared me to the topic for life. It is a lot of motivation for a ten year old in other words! I have even seen my environmental heart bleed into my writing life, as most of the stories I write organically have a flowing stream of conscience interwoven into the on-going conversation on how best to conserve, preserve, reduce, recycle, and sustain our natural resources as much as the natural environment of the Earth’s ecosystem which sits quite fragile in the wake of our advances.

Previously, I hosted Sandra Leesmith (author of “Love’s Promises” which is an upcoming book review outside of her official blog tour) during a Cover Reveal post to help alert the word to readers of her next novel’s release. I appreciate taking part in these projects for authors as I am not only an advocate for certain causes but I am a true blue bookcheerleader to the level that if there is a book I feel passionately about I am quite eager to champion its cause on my blog! Ms. Leesmith returned to Jorie Loves A Story for an Author Interview which knitted together into a conjoined conversation about the environment and my own personal thoughts about green-minded publishing practices and the dedication of those in the industry who are already taking strides to green our books!

Regular readers, subscribers, and visitors of Jorie Loves A Story will start to see more blog posts dedicated to this vein of dialogue, thought, and supposition as it is a personal passion of mine as a reader, a book blogger, a patron of public libraries, and a citizen of Earth. There are already sub-focuses in place threaded into the heart of my blog (i.e. adoption stories in fiction, Children’s Literature, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Classical Literature, Inspirational Fiction Authors, etc) however this will evolve and turn into a new resource in my blog’s sidebar as I compile the links I am uncovering to help spread the word and empower readers, writers, and other enthused supporters of green-minded practices inside the publishing industry. You will also start to denote a new ‘category’ attached to my book reviews which will be “The Ecological Factor” which will give credence of recognition for books printed by green methods and/or produced with sustainability practices.

Likewise, before my blog’s official first birthday on 6th of August, 2014 I am hopeful to not only flesh out my sidebar to include more links than it already contains, but to keep them updated for bookish events stateside, throughout the Canadian Provinces, and around the world as I find the events which pique my own interest to attend if I were able to do so. I always encourage readers to contact me if they know of a link which would befit inclusion in my sidebar by either leaving me a blog comment on a post OR through using my Contact Form under “My Bookish Life“.

Jorie Loves A Story is truly a work-in-progress and as I grow in knowledge so too will my bookish blog! Always remember to scout out a sighting for “Related Articles” at the bottom of my posts as those are hand-selected by me, viewed & read prior to inclusion and are knitted to the topic or subject at hand. Each top menu of my blog has a supporting page (except for “Stories” as I swapped out “Home” for a word more relevant! although, if you hover you will find categories of ‘stories’ to click-over too!) as well as drop-down supporting categories to easily guide you on your way through my blog! Clouds for topics, subjects, genres, authors, and publishers are located in the lower portion of my sidebar for convenience.

As I expand into more topics on the environment I look forward to the ensuing conversations left in the comment threads and/or in tweets on Twitter! I am always humbled and grateful for each person who takes a moment to contact me and to extend the joy of what is being shared and discussed. My plan is also to seek out pro-positive and honest stories both in fiction and non-fiction which have an under-thread of environmental science or green-minded practices to help paint a positive light on a subject that is too oft-times controversial. Thank you for always being open to take the journey with me!

My Review of Seeing Green:

As I began the story inside Seeing Green, my mind instantly propelled me backwards into my own childhood’s eye of knowing fully the importance of Earth Summits and the ability to have world leaders openly discuss and talk about a pro-positive future for saving the environment as much as endeavouring to harness practices which will not continue to forsake natural resources. As a young girl I could see the fragility of the Earth simply by observation of the natural world outside the confines of my everyday wanderings. There are examples of the harshness humans can inflict on nature and on natural resources if you bend your eyes, heart, and mind towards viewing the natural environment through the eyes of those who inhabit the world outside our civilised cities and townes. The ecological ramifications are deeper than any of us could hope to emphatically understand yet within the hope of what we can achieve lies the greatest surge to rectify our mistakes and champion the wisdom from what we have learnt in their wake.

I should not have smirked in acknowledgement of a behest of disillusioned frustration towards America’s inability to take the bull by the horns on the global stage to initiate environmental protocols, but how could I not smirk? Herein the smirk refers to growing up in a country bent towards change but hindered by the ability to make change happen in a way that is not only feasible but truly with the best intentions backed by the knowledge of how to properly put the right changes into action. A murmuring echo of a conversation I had with a German friend of mine and myself had around the Christmastide a few years back came startling back into focus as we had a rather hearty debate by how in the infancy of my country, her country had already triumphed such remarkable strides towards true green living practices such as a non-waste ordinance in cities to recycle all glass bottles – whether in the privacy of your house or out in the errands of your life. Recycle bins are as viable and visible as rubbish bins, which I could sympathise with as that was one of my dreams for my own future whilst living with the knowledge that progress takes a slower road towards the change she felt was second nature.

I had to nod in recognition of the fact that women’s fashion designs have completely jumped the rails as far as what a true woman’s figure actually can hold within its being! At 18, I was plumb aghast, appalled, and properly gobsmacked by how fashion had altered its perception of real women and real bodies, whilst attempting to compartmentalise all of us into a cookie-cutter blueprint which does not exist in the real world. I hope all women rock the creative out-of-box mentality I have done in seeking femininity in a world bent against the true essence of the woman divine.

I loved Arcani’s Aunt Lilian’s sense of knowing how to uplift her niece’s spirits even without knowing the full details of what stressed her to the brink of needing a cup of comfort and love. The novel is writ with a no nonsense approach of being true to self-identity as much as understanding ethnicity from a new perspective of a modern woman making her way in the worlds whilst holding onto the elements of what make her whole as a Native American. Owning her heritage and marvelling at how her sister Caroline would fail a test if asked of her Hopi roots.

Arcani herself is lit afire by an intense desire to help the Earth and to pull back the excessive need of humanity’s drive towards consumption and exploitation of viable natural resources. Through her eyes we are taken back to a near-future outlook in the 1990s where hope was a thin determined line towards socioeconomic change in a lack of green-minded initiation. She sees the world as a half empty glass of exhausted lost causes through the apathy and stagnation she observes by how everyday life and the errands therein function. Her anguish over knowing her heart’s calling and the inclination of obstinate opposition deflects her rage but reaffirms her grit in rising above the stacked challenges to make a difference in a world bent against anything changing at all.

Her reconnection to her parent’s origins and the roots of her history as a Hopi were explored as she returned to where her parents had once lived. By going back to find a semblance of what once was she started to reveal bits of her authentic self and in so doing, enabled her to move forward towards a future that would be decided on her terms; not on the wanton hopes of others. She even found a soothsayer whose wisdom painted a calming balm of grandfatherly love around her shoulders which was ached for as a connection of the heart. His guidance allowed her to see what was blocked to her before their encounter: at times when a blockage of progress cannot be released due to a conflict which is not easily resolved, one must seek the middle way of eclipsing the muddlement of stasis. Life provides us with an innate ability to determine our own fate whilst giving us the opportunity to impact the lives of those we endeavour to protect by changing the way in which we live today.

 

On how far we still have yet to go:

Extending out of my second paragraph of my review of Seeing Green, I wanted to empathsis that there are communities and towneships already riding on the wave of progress towards a viable augmentation of pro-ecological and environmental change. Communities which support the locovore and slow food movements to discourage the trucking of fresh fruit and veg outside of a window of 100 miles. Communities which ignite a fever of hope by helping make recycling resources available to everyone either by curbside pick-up bins or by implementing the recycling bins at key sites in close proximity to where neighbourhoods can commute. Rainwater collection bins on the outside of homes are replacing the excessive use of water tapped from city or county water lines as residents find new ways to adapt to water shortages whilst enabling them freedom to water more often for their personal needs.

Homeless shelters and missions are implementing self-sustaining practices by growing tracts of organic and/or non-chemical crops to not only feed their own but to outsource the surplus to gain back a living wage to those in need of it most. Community co-ops for health food, local produce, and local / state made products are sprouting up to take place of national green-grocers who cannot always serve the locality sector as well or with as many benefits to local trade and commerce. Local forest and park officers are finding non-chemical ways of treating insect pests and protecting local water resources such as lake, stream, river, and estuaries from being cross-contaminated. Solar powered rubbish and recycle bins are being inserted around downtown centers of business to help encourage pedestrians to pitch wiser and with a green heart in mind.

Certain restaurants and eateries are backing away from using takeaway containers which have no recycle or reusable value to them by implementing the use of those that can be turnt back in for a second use. Electric car recharging stations are being sourced and built to give hybrid or full electric car drivers a place to ‘fill their tank’ around county or city buildings. It is easier to compost and reuse kitchen waste than it was say twenty years ago, as much as finding green friendly building supplies, personal hygiene products, house cleaning products, and every imaginable ‘product’ that a person could use in their everyday life.

There are a myriad of changes occurring right now in all our local communities both known or unknown which are creating positive strides towards a better tomorrow. All change is codependent on our own ability to implement the changes we can in our own lives which in effect inspire others to do the same. The ones that I have shared are either in place in my local community and/or are in place in communities around the nation in which I personally know of being practiced.

Yet, despite this turning tide perspective of how far we have come, there is still a heap of work left to do towards creating a greener space for all of us to thrive and build a stronger future for everyone yet bourne. We have to stay resilient and mindful of new ways in which to sustain ourselves and our local communities, not only for food but for water. We have to continue to think outside the box, and find ways to help our neighbours and those in our community who need our assistance. It came be as simple as giving a person a ride who cannot find one otherwise to taking someone to the local farmer’s market to source local produce. It is by finding ways to have local plots available for residents to keep herbs and veg for their own needs as much as finding ways to keep our footprint a bit lighter as we walk through our journey.

We have to be respectful of how far we have come but not to become stagnant and believe that is all we can achieve. It is to keep the dialogue in motion and by instilling the proper hope and belief to everyone coming up behind us that change is a living entity that resides in each of us. Each person can effectively change one singular act of environmental conservation and preservation.

And, this book blogger in particular is encouraged by seeing print books becoming greener with each year non-old growth forest paper is sourced, veg & soy inks are replacing harsher chemicals, and the bindings of books is created using materials which do not destroy more than what we can replace in a kinder more renewing way towards sustainability. Some might advocate for less print books, but for each person who reads electronically may they realise that not every reader can read on a digitalised screen and those of us who read strictly in print format are championing the printers and publishers who are leading the charge for a greener world of literature!

Fly in the Ointment:

I do believe I caught a copy-edit error on page 17, as there is mention of a 2002 model of a car when I believe we were still in the present year of 1992? Normally I shake off a copy-edit error, but in this instance it threw me for a bit of a loop except the rest of the paragraph was most decidedly not taking place in 2002!

Elsewhere I found the minor inclusions of vulgarity to be a bit tame until of course the worst word I think that is oft used too readily for my particular tastes made its first appearance on page 18. As outlined in previous ‘Fly in the Ointments’ I am not one who condones the use of vulgarity to the level of extensiveness as some novels have the tendency of doing. One exception to this preference of mine was ‘Etched On Me‘ which is in a different category altogether in of its own. I transcended the language barrier by finding myself intrigued by Arcani as a character and as a woman struggling to find her feet in environmental advocacy and activism. Her character’s spirit shines strong and is one character I found myself overlooking using words which inwardly make me cringe.

I was a bit puzzled by how a novel written about the environment did not include any disclosure or stamp of sustainable print sources for the paper or for the production of the book. In fact, I nearly felt I had received an ARC except that there isn’t a disclaimer towards this end anywhere I could find inside the book or outside of it. I claimed this as a ‘self-published’ novel due to the fact the only markings of how it exists is the copyright notice (simply a statement of year) and a brief biography of Annabel Hertz on the last page of the novel itself. It is the very first novel I have ever picked up which does not list a Library of Congress listing nor does it have anything between the cover page and the author’s biography except the text of the story itself. It is a bare bones edition which intrigued me to say the least.

Fun Stuff for Your Blog via pureimaginationblog.com

Severn Cullis-Suzuki returns to Rio 20 years after stopping the world via Green Cross

Fun Stuff for Your Blog via pureimaginationblog.comThis book review is courtesy of:

Seeing Green Virtual Book Tour with JKS Communications

Be sure to scope out my Bookish Upcoming Events

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Tour stops I enjoyed for  “Seeing Green”:

Click the tour badge for a full listing!

More will be added here in coming days! As this blog tour is in-progress!

Fun Stuff for Your Blog via pureimaginationblog.com

Seeing Green
by Annabel Hertz
Source: Direct from Publicist

Places to find the book:

Add to LibraryThing

Genres: Biological Diversity, Ecology, Literary Fiction, Science, Science & Technology


Published by Self Published Author

on 15th April, 2014

Format: Paperback

Pages: 223

Reader Interactive Question: I am most curious to hear what impression of environmental advocacy and/or environmental protection you grew up with during your own generation inasmuch to see your thoughts on eco-friendly innovations in the comment threads. I welcome the conversation to take on its own thread of interest and to keep a green-minded forum of open exchange on various posts as I move forward with environmental focused book reviews and blog posts. I was a bit surprised by how much I have to share on my own behalf, but I sometimes note that there are certain books whose topic of focus re-fuel our own passions and give us a platform to express of thoughts and opinions. I’d be keen to learn which books (either fiction or non-fiction) on the topic at hand would be recommended for me to seek out to read next after my reading of “Seeing Green”!?

{SOURCES: Book cover for “Seeing Green”, author photograph of Annabel Hertz, author biography & book synopis (taken from the Press Kit) were provided by JKS Communications and used with permission. Severn Cullis-Suzuki lectures via We Canada & Green Cross had either URL share links or coding which made it possible to embed this media portal to this post, and I thank them for the opportunity to share more about this novel and the author who penned it. Blog Tour badge provided by Parajunkee to give book bloggers definition on their blogs. Post dividers by Fun Stuff for Your Blog via Pure Imagination.}

Copyright © Jorie Loves A Story, 2014.

Reading this book contributed to these challenges:

  • Go Indie
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Posted Thursday, 1 May, 2014 by jorielov in 21st Century, Blog Tour Host & Reviewer, Bookish Discussions, Bookish Films, Debut Author, Debut Novel, Earth Summit, Eco-Friendly, Ecology, Environmental Activism, Environmental Advocacy, Environmental Conscience, Environmental Science, Equality In Literature, Fly in the Ointment, Green Publishing, Green-Minded Publishers, Green-Minded Social Awareness, Indie Author, Interviews Related to Content of Novel, JKS Communications: Literary Publicity Firm, Judaism in Fiction, Native American Fiction, Political Narrative & Modern Topics, Preservation, Social Change, Sustainability & Ecological Preservation, Sustainability Practices inside the Publishing Industry, Upcycle & Recycle Practices, Vulgarity in Literature, Yiddish Words & Phrases